PlayMonday offers 10p per ticket to floods charities

first_imgPlayMonday offers 10p per ticket to floods charities Online charity lottery PlayMonday is to donate 10p per ticket sold today in aid of charities working to help deal with the impact of the floods in England and Wales.The donations will be made via Justgiving. They will be in addition to the income raised for this week’s beneficiary charities Child Brain Injury Trust, Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Seafarers UK, Sense, and Whizz-kidz.The PlayMonday lottery has so far donated £2,025,364 to beneficiary charities. Advertisement Tagged with: Digital Gaming AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  26 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 26 July 2007 | Newslast_img read more

Prime Minister’s office has spoof website closed down

first_img March 30, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Prime Minister’s office has spoof website closed down January 21, 2021 Find out more November 19, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information News to go further News RSF condemns Facebook’s blocking of journalistic content in Australia Google experiments drop Australian media from search results Receive email alerts Follow the news on Australia Organisation News February 22, 2021 Find out more AustraliaAsia – Pacific News Reporters Without Borders voiced shock today at the methods used by the office of Australian Prime Minister John Howard to censor parody website Johnhowardpm.org, on which political commentator Richard Neville (photo) posted a spoof speech by Howard about the presence of Australian troops in Iraq. The prime minister’s office had the website closed down on 14 March by going to Melbourne IT, the company that administers its domain name. On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia Reporters Without Borders voiced shock today at the methods used by the office of Australian Prime Minister John Howard to censor parody website Johnhowardpm.org, on which political commentator Richard Neville posted a spoof speech by Howard about the presence of Australian troops in Iraq.The prime minister’s office had the website closed down on 14 March by going to Melbourne IT, the company that administers its domain name.“All the world’s leaders are subject to parody and the Australian prime minister should learn to live with it rather than banning it,” Reporters Without Borders said. “And anyway, to close down a website, a court order should be required, not just an administrative decision. This type of censorship is unacceptable in democracy, in which website managers have the same rights as those who run traditional media.”Aping the design of the prime minister’s official website, the satirical johnhowardpm.org website carried spoof statements by Howard. A supposed fault in its registration with Melbourne IT was the grounds given for its closure. But Reporters Without Borders has verified that it was registered under the name of R. Neville and was therefore perfectly valid.Melbourne IT blocked the domain name in response to an e-mail request from a member of the prime minister’s office. Johnhowardpm.org is now redirected to Neville’s personal website on which the Iraq war spoof speech is available.Neville has not received any official notification of the site’s closure. He angrily told Reporters Without Borders: “I think that closing down a website is like burning a newspaper, only it is done with a velvet glove. There would have been people in the street if a newspaper had been censored like this.” Although the site was online for only 36 hours, it received more than 10,000 visits, he said.Reporters Without Borders has condemned other cases of pressure being put on domain name administrators to censor websites. Last December, the Kazakh government managed to strip British comedian Ali G. of the ability to use the .kz domain name for his website. More details.————-Create your blog with Reporters without borders: www.rsfblog.org RSF_en AustraliaAsia – Pacific last_img read more