More Reasons to Doubt Scientific Omniscience

first_img(Visited 446 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 We hear it all the time; 99% of scientists agree. All it takes, though, is one overlooked fact to tumble a consensus.Occasionally we take a look at matters other than creation and evolution, when they are instructive about the scientific process. The scientific consensus on climate change (previously known as “global warming”) is a case in point. Scientists have been so dogmatic about it they have convinced most major world governments to enact draconian measures to counteract it. Climate has changed drastically in the past before humans evolved, they will admit, but they insist that the current climate excursion was caused by people trying to increase their happiness and reduce their suffering. News about global warming often includes denunciations of President Donald Trump for pulling America out of the Paris Climate Accords.We don’t quote climate “denialists” to get into the mud on this issue. We just look at the secular news itself, which is almost uniformly on the side of the climate consensus, and ask questions (see this list for previous entries). We pass over the ridiculous stories about what’s coming with global warming, like this headline on Phys.org, “Competition between males improves resilience against climate change.” Claims like that nobody could ever know for sure. Instead, we focus on the epistemology of the consensus: how do they know what they claim to know about human culpability for a warming climate? Did the consensus take the following factors into account?These ‘Dirty’ Thunderstorms Fill Sky with As Much Smoke As Volcanic Eruption (Live Science). Big volcanic eruptions, it is well known, can alter the climate. A well-known case was the Mt. Pinatubo eruption that reduced global temperatures for a time by 0.9° F in 1991. This article says that pyrocumulonimbus storms (pyroCb’s), or “dirty thunderstorms” fed by ash from wildfires, can put as much carbon smoke into the atmosphere as a volcano. “While such major volcanic events are sporadic, Peterson said, pyroCb events occur every year,” the article ends. “But scientists have not studied these storms enough to understand their potential impact on the climate.” Since wildfires are common, and have occurred long before man started burning coal or oil, would climate models produce different conclusions if pyroCbs were taken into account?Smoke from a relatively small wildfire.Tiny particles high up in the sky give insight into climate change (Phys.org). Black carbon (BC) can reflect incoming solar heat back into space, this article says. So can the clouds that form around the particles. Atmospheric particles, or aerosols, are thought to be the second or third most important factor after carbon dioxide. But do scientists understand its contribution? Note the uncertainty in this quote regarding a substantial contributor to climate change (which would seem to lower temperatures rather than raise them).Aerosols, tiny particles that are suspended in the atmosphere, contribute significantly towards climate change. However, despite their consequential role, aerosol interactions aren’t very well understood.The authors say that particles can last for years and influence regions far from cities with their pollution. The concentration of these particles over the Amazon Basin was higher than expected. Does this give anyone confidence in climate models, with their dire predictions of temperature changes a century away, specified in tenths of a degree? Yet those are the models used to scare politicians into taking drastic action.Microbes eat rocks and leave carbon dioxide (Science Magazine). This news item reveals that geologists and climatologists were wrong about silicate rocks acting as a carbon sink to counterbalance the outgassing of volcanoes. Microbes in the silicates can actually “eat” the rocks and release much of that carbon back into the atmosphere as CO2. A study of these rocks in Taiwan showed that “microbes oxidize roughly two-thirds of the petrogenic organic carbon there and that the rate of oxidation increases with the rate of erosion.”How does the Pacific Walker circulation respond to strong tropical volcanism? (Phys.org). Read this news item to get an idea of how complicated it is to tease out the significance of individual factors that might alter the climate. Severe volcanic eruptions (SVE’s), like the recent one in Bali, Indonesia, “can affect Earth’s climate.” But by how much? Trying to figure that out is complex, because a large eruption, which is unpredictable, can affect air currents in unexpected ways that are not well understood. Obviously humans are not responsible for what volcanoes do. Note, too, that SVEs tend to have a cooling effect. “The cooling effect from the SVEs is able to cool the entire tropics,” the article says, and yet the temperature anomalies that result are not uniform.Anthropogenic combustion iron as a complex climate forcer (Nature Communications). Even though this paper mentions a factor that might exacerbate warming, the key fact is that it was not taken into account before. “Our results demonstrate that anthropogenic combustion iron is a larger and more complex climate forcer than previously thought, and therefore plays a key role in the Earth system,” the authors say. This should lead thoughtful observers to ask what other factors have not been considered, that could be larger or smaller than previously thought?The Politics of Climate ChangeRepublicans more persuasive than scientists on climate change (Science Daily). This article, pretending to be an unbiased analysis of political attitudes about climate change, ends up as a partisan advocacy piece. The authors of a psychological survey at the University of Connecticut seem disturbed that Republicans who argue against anthropogenic climate change are more persuasive than the scientific consensus. But rather than see if Republican counter-arguments have merit, the authors delve into ways to package consensus arguments in more persuasive ways. They assume that Republicans are engaging in misinformation. “Citing Republican elites who endorse the scientific consensus on climate change may be the most effective way to persuade citizens that climate change is a real and important problem,” says Lyle Scruggs, a professor of political science at University of Connecticut. “That may be a step forward in reducing the partisan gap in public opinion on the subject.” Anyone smell partisanship in that comment?In closing, maybe it’s worth asking what the ruckus is about. Mike Wall wrote on Space.com, “Life on Venus? Why It’s Not an Absurd Thought.” Venus, we note, is a very warm planet. Astrobiologist David Grinspoon says that the atmosphere a few dozen miles up is pretty benign – if the Venusians can tolerate the sulfuric acid. So why worry? If climate change wipes out human society, some scientists, like the misanthrope Eric Pianka who wants to solve overpopulation of stupid people by releasing atmospheric ebola to kill billions of people indiscriminately, might be happy. Darwin will ensure that the next generation of organisms on earth will be heat-tolerant, acid-tolerant, and will vote Democrat. That’s not an absurd thought at all, now is it? Not for the scientific consensus.Dr Eric Pianka, ardent evolutionist and genocide advocate, by J B Greene. Used by permission.last_img read more

How to use Media Club South Africa’s free photo library

first_imgAll you need to know about locating and downloading high-resolution images from Media Club South Africa’s free photo library.One of Media Club South Africa’s offerings is a free photo library containing over 3 000 images of people and places across South Africa.The photos are available in low resolution (50KB to 200KB in size) and in high, print-ready resolution (1MB to over 10MB in size) – free of any charge.The photos are organised into 12 categories. PeopleCitiesInfrastructureBusiness and industrySouth Africa at workArts and cultureTourism and leisureNatureCountrysideDevelopmentBuildings and structuresSoccer fans and stadiumsTo download the high-resolution version, right-click on “Download high-res image” below the thumbnail and select “Save … as” (wording varies by browser) to save a copy of the photo onto your computer. If you republish the photos on the web or in print you are obliged to credit both the photographer and Media Club South Africa.On the web, this credit must include a link to Media Club South Africa.See also:Photo library terms and conditions of usePhoto library previewIf you have any further queries, or need help, email Mary Alexander at [email protected]last_img read more

Louis Oosthuizen captures Africa Open

first_imgOosthuizen birdied the first hole of a sudden-death playoff to beat England’s Chris Wood and Spain’s Manuel Quiros to the title, which is his third on the European Tour and signalled a welcome return to top form after he struggled with an injury towards the end of 2010. “The whole day was a struggle actually. It was one of those tournaments where the putter was very cold. But my caddie Zack told me to just be patient and the putts will drop,” said Oosthuizen. Charl Schwartzel put on a good show in defence of his title and posted a 70 to finish alongside Jaco van Zyl and Steven O’Hara on 15-under-par 277, only one shot behind the leading trio. Oosthuizen now leaves South Africa for a few tournaments on the European Tour before joining the PGA Tour, and admits he’s excited about this new chapter in his life. ‘Ecstatic’“It’s a great way to start the season. This is my first European Tour title in South Africa and I’m quite ecstatic about that,” said Oosthuizen, whose winner’s cheque of €158 500 (almost R1.4-million) helped lift him to the top of the Race to Dubai standings. “I’m looking forward to the whole year, playing half in America and Europe. I’m looking forward to contending on both money lists.” “It was a terrible tee shot, but it worked out well because I had a flat lie and could hit a full sand wedge, so I knew with a bit of spin I could get it close,” said Oosthuizen, who went on to hit his second shot to five metres from the hole. LEADERBOARD Quiros found his own putting form with three birdies in the final three holes to also make the playoff. Louis Oosthuizen (-16) 70, 67, 69, 70, 276 Chris Wood (-16) 72, 69, 67, 68, 276 Manuel Quiros (-16) 71, 68, 68, 69, 276 Steven O’Hara (-15) 72, 71, 68, 66, 277 Jaco van Zyl (-15) 67, 70, 70, 70, 277 Charl Schwartzel (-15) 69, 70, 68, 70, 277 Robert Dinwiddie (-14) 69, 74, 66, 69, 278Shaun Norris (-13) 70, 73, 70, 66, 279 Eirik Tage Johansen (-13) 71, 71, 70, 67, 279 Branden Grace (-13) 67, 69, 72, 71, 279 Miles Tunnicliff (-13) 67, 69, 72, 71, 279 Jbe Kruger (-13) 68, 72, 67, 72, 279 Markus Brier (-13) 70, 66, 70, 73, 279 Matthew Nixon (-12) 71, 74, 68, 67, 280 Oliver Bekker (-12) 69, 71, 69, 71, 280 Carlos Del Moral (-12) 70, 70, 69, 71, 280 Thomas Aiken (-12) 69, 72, 68, 71, 280 The Open champion closed with a 70, Wood a 68, and Quiros a 69 to see them all tied on 16-under-par. That putt finally arrived on the par-five 15th green, where Oosthuizen holed out for eagle from about 12 metres to share the lead with Wood on 15-under. But he was denied the sole lead when his birdie putt on 16 lipped out.center_img “I wasn’t expecting much having not practiced much with all the snow at home. But when you’re in a position to win, it’s disappointing not to do it. I didn’t do much wrong and can’t really fault myself, but it just didn’t happen for me.” Louis Oosthuizen added another Open to his list of victories when he won the Africa Open after a three-man playoff at the East London Golf Club on Sunday. DisappointmentFor rising English star Chris Wood, there was disappointment at not following through to claim a maiden victory on the European Tour. Oosthuizen, meanwhile, kept at it and tied for the lead on the 15th with an eagle. He needed a birdie on one of the three remaining holes to take victory, but managed only pars to set up the playoff. Luckily for him, he found the birdie he needed at the first extra hole. SAinfo reporter The South African had been tied for the third round lead with Markus Brier, but the Austrian made a storming start, with three consecutive birdies to take the sole lead. However, a lost ball on the sixth saw Brier slip back and he never recovered. Birdie for victoryWood hit his approach to about 10 metres, while Quiros went just over the back of the green. Both Quiros and Wood parred the hole, leaving Oosthuizen to make his putt for birdie and the win. 10 January 2011 Teeing off first in the playoff on the par-four 18th, Oosthuizen didn’t hit the best of tee shots and came close to out of bounds before it kicked right and rolled onto the fairway. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Giving kids a sporting chance in life

first_imgIn the 25 years that Sporting Chance has been in existence, it has worked with about 170 000 and even helped unearth exceptional sporting talent. (Images: Shamin Chibba)Sporting Chance, as the name suggests, is a sports development agency that gives children from disadvantaged backgrounds the opportunity to participate in sport while also receiving a physical education.One of the organisation’s more important goals was to instil an active life pattern, said founder and managing director Brad Bing. He was speaking at a Play Your Part Rugby Activation held at Khayelitsha Rugby Stadium in Cape Town on 2 October. “What you need is to create life patterns by the age of 12. You don’t just wake up on your 14th birthday and say, ‘Tomorrow I’m going to play squash.’ Your kids are going to grow up following that and that’s the culture we need to have.”Sporting Chance helped Play Your Part facilitate the activation in Khayelitsha, bringing along rugby coaches and experts to train the children.With calypso cricket and street soccer programmes their mainstay, Sporting Chance is taking sport to the children. “Basically we never make plans. All we do is facilitate the opportunity and these kids have got to grab the opportunity themselves,” said Bing.Bing himself has been active all his life. He played cricket professionally for Western Province in the late 1980s and played in England for 10 years. After he retired, he returned to South Africa with the idea of getting children outside and playing sport.“I came back with international ideas to South Africa and if you remember correctly in the 1980s it was the height of apartheid and the height of the struggle. Not many people understood the ideas I was talking about. Out of pure frustration, in September 1990 I said: ‘That’s it, I’m going to start my own company.’”And 25 years later, the organisation is still moving strongly. It has worked with about 170 000 children, some of whom have gone on to represent South Africa at the highest level. According to Bing, these include six members of the national men’s hockey side and cricket player Herschelle Gibbs.However, he insists that the organisation’s job is not to produce international level talent but to get children to play sport, lead a healthy lifestyle and receive mentorship from experienced coaches.Play Your Part worked with Sporting Chance coaches to run the rugby activation in Khayelitsha, Cape Town. MENTORSHIP IS CRUCIALBing’s cricket career would not have bloomed had he not received mentorship from teachers, coaches, fellow players and his father. “On a Saturday morning, when my dad or my mom took me to play cricket, they sat there and watched me. And my father would say to me: ‘You made this mistake or that mistake.’ These kids don’t have that. In our townships, those parents only come back at night and those kids get fed and put into bed so where does the mentorship come about?”When a budding athlete from a disadvantaged background lacked mentorship, he added, it was difficult to progress through the ranks. “That’s the obstacle we have to get around. You’ll always see our township [children] struggling and that is the bridge we have to cross in order to make sure that South Africa really becomes a powerhouse in sport.“If I was formerly disadvantaged I would still be toyi-toying outside the Department of Sport and Recreation’s office not because I want to be a rebel but because I want more access to facilities.” By having the sports facilities and equipment at their disposal, Brad Bing believes children from disadvantaged areas like Khayelitsha can realise their potential not just as athletes but as good people too.LACK OF ACCESSSporting Chance sees itself as a business that gives communities access to sports, coaches and facilities. “We run coaching programmes as well regardless of the type of sport it is in that community.”At the rugby activation in Khayelitsha, Bing said that though there were facilities in the area, they were not maintained. “We have a rugby facility here but with all due respect you look at the clubhouse… You’ve got the poles here but you don’t see the field markings and if the fields are not marked are you telling me that rugby is actually played on a daily basis… most of those people are out there working, when do they have time to make the club work?” Bing asked.“So we are talking about rugby but where are the squash courts and the tennis courts? There are cricket facilities that haven’t been maintained. How are we going to produce black cricket in communities?”In addition, although the facility was there, residents did not have access to equipment. “We fully know that if we leave equipment here we won’t find it tomorrow so you need someone to lead that facility and make sure it’s secure.”There is also no access to professional and structured coaching. At the rugby activation, former Springboks Sevens player Mpho Mbiyozo and Sporting Chance coaches were on hand to teach children from the township about rugby and life.However, Bing said such events took place once; training programmes should be ongoing. “Believe me, in a population as big as Khayelitsha where you have got half-a-million people, you can have 400 to 500 kids coming here at any time.”Mbiyozo agreed, saying: “It ends here today, and when they go home and they’re all happy. This event is a seed but we need to water it to germinate.”last_img read more

Dairy farm economics not adding up

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It has happened to every farmer.The production numbers are plugged into the calculator, and double-checked, but they just do not seem to be adding up quite right on the short side of profitability.These days many dairy producers are drinking a couple of extra glasses of milk to calm their nerves and enjoying an additional scoop of ice cream to take their minds off of the unpleasant budget realities on the farm.Lou Brown of New Bremen has been crunching the numbers on his dairy farm and does not like the numbers he is seeing.“We’re at $13 milk right now on our 275-cow herd with a 70-pound average. That is 19,250 pounds of milk a day. That is 192.50 hundredweights at $13 that comes to $2,502.50 a day in the value of the milk. At $7 a day per cow with 275 cows, that comes to $1,925 a day for my feed bill. That leaves me with $577 to pay all of the other expenses. If I had one hired person full time I would need 40 more cows to justify that one person,” Brown said. “My price goal to average over five years is $20 a hundredweight. Two years ago it was $26, but feed costs were higher then. The milk price actually went down to $9 in 2009, which has been the low in the last eight years.”At $10 per hundredweight it is $57,750 a month in income. At $15 milk, it is $86,625 in monthly income and at $20 it is $115,500 a month in income.“That milk price makes a huge difference in gross revenue for us,” Brown said. “You’re constantly on a price roller coaster.”The farm (like many others) has implemented numerous long-term strategies to handle the inevitable economic tough times inherent in production agriculture. Brownhaven Farm is all family labor. The Brown family has been on the land since 1959 when Lou’s parents bought it. It is now run by Lou, his brother, and Lou’s son.“We started with two cows and by the 70s we were up to 80 cows,” he said. “Today we have grown to 280 cows  — all Holstein. Our wives and children help as well.”The vast majority of milk from Brownhaven Farm goes to nearby Dannon and is marketed through DFA.“I don’t really see a premium but I am only three or four miles away and it doesn’t make sense to truck it anywhere else,” Brown said.Dannon is a very valuable local market, but has been requiring increasingly stringent requirements in recent years based on various consumer and industry demands, each adding costs along the way. In addition, Brown’s 250-acre farm is in both the Grand Lake St. Marys Watershed and in the Lake Erie watershed, the two most regulated watersheds in the state. This regulation also brings with it extra costs and challenges in the form of manure management and cover crops.“We raise half our hay and all of our corn silage,” Brown said. “All of our corn silage ground gets cover crop on it. I grow no soybeans, just corn and hay. The best ground stays in corn. I use an oats and radish mix which winter kills. My cost for just the oat seed is $1,500 on 150 acres.“I get government funding for cost share on the cover crops, but I have to match all of their guidelines to qualify. They have a cost share program. You could do it on your own but you will have $3,500 to $4,000 to put cover crops on 150 acres. And some cover crops are twice that cost. If I didn’t have cost share, it would be much harder to make the decision to do that. Maybe I would only do half the farm verses the whole farm. What is the value of the organic matter I’m getting, the erosion I am stopping and the runoff I am preventing? It does definitely help the corn yield too. Cover crops may be worth $4,000 a year, very easily, but they are also an extra cost.”The liquid manure lagoon storage for the farm is adequate to hold enough to apply in the spring before planting.“The majority of the time we apply lagoon manure before we plant corn. We either use a Miller disk or field cultivator before and after manure application. We knife it in and go over it again and then plant corn,” Brown said. “They want us to work the ground before we apply the lagoon manure to disturb the soil so it doesn’t have a direct route to the tile. The only other fertility I add is liquid 28% — 10 gallons at planting and 40 gallons an acre sidedress.”The Browns get the rest of their cattle feed needs met through neighboring farms to help control costs.“All of the corn for grain is bought from neighbors and we grind it here on the farm. We have our own bean extruder as well. All the wheat straw for bedding is grown by neighbors too — for the last 10 years we have been buying from neighbors. It makes more sense to buy from the neighbors then to go and pay $10,000 or $12,000 an acre for more ground,” Brown said. “We use our own equipment and labor to harvest the neighbor’s crops. We harvest earlage, silage and grain for grinding. We do everything on the hay. Usually first cutting is chopped for haylage and the rest is in big squares. We try for five cuttings.“This last weekend we chopped 92 acres of rye which gave us 600 tons of extra feed valued at $15,000. We had a neighbor who decided to put it out as cover and he let us chop it. It gave him an extra cash crop and we provided all the labor.”These and other practices help keep costs down when milk prices drop. Major purchases are made carefully during good times.“We don’t change a lot when milk prices are low, but we keep close tabs on expenses. We try to put off buying more expensive $5,000 to $10,000 investments or higher. We fix more things instead of investing in new,” Brown said. “You have to set your priorities every day and look at your goals. You might make mistakes, but you hope that doesn’t happen. For a dairy farm, a mistake could be as simple as what if milk from a treated cow went into the bulk tank that day. That is a costly mistake. You have to be careful to avoid those when times are tight.“If you need to expand or improve, do it in small amounts. Don’t try to do it all in one year. Hopefully the smart managers saved back $2 a hundredweight when it was over $20 for now when things are low.”And, at least for the immediate future, milk prices look to stay low.“Historically it is a seven to eight year cycle but it is anybody’s guess with the global market the way it is today. Changes in China or Russia impact our farm,” Brown said. “Mother Nature will either have to throw in a drought or we’ll have to wait for the school year to start so the volume of fluid milk will go up again.”A big production bump in Europe has helped build up a large global milk supply, according to John Newton, the Senior Director of Economic Research for the National Milk Producers Federation.“It will take time for us to work through the global inventory and one way to do that is through lower prices to the consumer. In the European Union they just removed the quota system and we’ve seen milk production in Europe increase significantly in the last year into the global market place. In the U.S., we export 12% to 15% of our milk production every year and we are exposed to what is happening internationally,” Newton said. “Farm prices are set based on wholesale commodity prices. When wholesale prices of cheese, or butter, or milk powders decrease, so too does the farm gate milk price. In this case, we have seen powder prices decline quite a bit, close to a dollar a pound. We have seen a dramatic decline in milk price from the highs in 2014.”As milk producers feel the pinch of low prices, milk processors enjoy strong profits.“Processors make money on the down side because their input costs are declining, but when input prices increase, they cannot turn around and raise their retail prices dramatically. There is an ebb and flow. End users need consistency. Pizza chains don’t change the price of their pizza on the menu every week as cheese prices change. They try to have a fixed price menu item,” Newton said. “Farm gate prices come down and soon after the retail price will follow. There is some price transmission, but currently the farmer’s share of the retail dollar is lower than it was in recent years. We would expect to see that with lower input costs, it will drive processors to have lower prices at the consumer level. When prices decline, retailers can offer more promotional specials. You could see two for one cheeseburgers, for example, and you would sell twice as much cheese when the prices for cheese are low. Those things in turn will help the farmer’s price.”last_img read more

Weather, tariffs, lack of planting yields increasing farm stress

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Kolt BuchenrothThe stagnant commodity prices, an ongoing trade war, and the uncertainty of tariffs impacting the farm economy are reason enough to induce plenty of stress in a farmer’s life. Add in the unprecedented rainfall most of the Buckeye State has seen this spring, rising input costs, and market volatility and Ohio’s agriculture community is facing a perfect storm for developing high levels of farm stress.Ohio State University Family and Consumer Science Extension Educator Jami Delllifield is advocating around the state and the country for the mental health of the agriculture community. She has taken note of the heightened farm stress situation this growing season.“We can’t control this. There is absolutely nothing right now that is within anyone’s control. Everything is just coming at us and it just seems to keep building. Plus, farmers are at an increased risk because their profession is isolated. They spend all day and night alone in a tractor with their thoughts,” Delliefield said.But, the idea of farm stress can be rooted much deeper than a single growing season or bad crop.“Farmers are wired to protect their land. We will do whatever it takes to protect what is ours. That includes our legacy,” Delliefield said. “There is a feeling of not only letting your family down, but letting down dad, grandpa, and the past generations of the farm.”While farmers are worrying about planting and doing field work, they also have to be worried about the operations of the rest of their farm.“The other piece that sets agriculture apart is for most of us, the companies we work for provide our facilities and equipment. It’s not our responsibility to keep the lights on and pay the rent. For a farmer, that isn’t the case. If the electric bill gets paid, if the crops go in, if the soils aren’t ideal, it’s all personal and it all adds stress,” Dellifield said.She continued to say that it can be challenging for those not engaged in agriculture to help producers when they don’t understand that legacy piece. Friends, neighbors, and spouses are the best eyes and ears to know if something could be wrong. Dellifield has some advice of signs to watch for as you visit the coffee shop in the morning or church on Sunday.“The first thing you want to look at is ‘are people showing up?’ This is a fight or flight response and people may come out with guns blazing, or they may be isolated,” she said. “It is perfectly okay to say ‘Today isn’t a good day. I’m feeling a little stressed.’ When one person starts talking about it, it’s likely someone else going through the same hardships will talk about it. Then, there is a community to come together and support one another.”Family members can also look for changes in drinking habits.“Another thing to watch for is someone who used to have a single alcoholic beverage with dinner now having two or three, or other increased drinking habits. Or, they might just not seem like themselves,” Dellifield said.When it comes to managing stress and specific to agriculture, there are resources available.“Think of a time when you overcame something that seemed insurmountable and hold onto that. Then, surround yourself with people that will help pull you through.” Dellifield said.Prior to her start in Extension four years ago, Dellifield had a background in psychology. Dellifield is on a multi-state team that works with the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development from the Farm Service Agency.“We facilitate trainings for county level FSA employees on what to do so they can help producers when they come in. That way, if they are seeing signs and symptoms, they know how they can help,” Dellifield said.Dellifield serves on a team that partners Extension with Ohio State’s College of Public Health. The group has just been awarded a grant to bring Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training to the rural parts of Ohio.“Just like we need first aid and CPR if someone has a heart attack right in front of us, we need to know how to have conversations and identify signs and symptoms,” Dellifield said. “We are compiling resources for anyone that lives in the state of Ohio — from doctors to producers and veterinarians to seed salesmen.”Those resources will be available by the end of the year. More information on MHFA and becoming trained is available at mentalhealthfirstaid.org. Several other Extension resources are available by typing farm stress into an internet search engine. If you or someone you know is thinking of hurting themselves, the national suicide prevention lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. Individuals can also text the word “home” to 741741. Veterans can send a text to 838255 to be connected with specialized resources. As always, in emergency situations, dial 9-1-1.last_img read more

Serena Williams beats Maria Sharapova for Olympic tennis gold

first_imgSerena Williams became only the second woman to complete a career Golden Slam when she won her first singles gold medal Saturday by beating Maria Sharapova 6-0, 6-1 at the London Olympics.The victory completed a remarkable run of domination by the No. 4-seeded Williams, who lost only 17 games in her six matches. She went 13-0 this summer at the All England Club, where she won her fifth Wimbledon title a month ago.The career Golden Slam was first achieved by Steffi Graf, who did it when she won the Olympics in 1988 after winning all four major titles. Williams can add the gold medal to her 14 Grand Slam singles championships, the most of any active woman.last_img read more

SAINTS began their preseason campaign with a soli

first_imgSAINTS began their pre-season campaign with a solid 38-18 victory over Dewsbury Rams.A much-improved second half performance saw them turn around a 14-10 deficit to eventually overhaul their spirited opponents.Theo Fages impressed on his Langtree Park bow whilst Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook and Mark Percival both crossed for braces.Ultimately, the game wasn’t about the result – more so Keiron Cunningham getting a look at his combinations.Saints looked lively in the opening stages with both Jack Owens and Matty Dawson making line breaks.But it took just five minutes for Luke Walsh to make his mark.Seeing Rams’ fullback Karl Pryce over on the far side, he fired a beautiful 40:20 to the near touchline to give his side great position.And within a couple of tackles, McCarthy-Scarsbrook was hit by a lovely ball to put Saints in front.Buoyant, the home side forced another Dewsbury error in the 12th minute, but couldn’t take advantage; likewise a few minutes later.That time Walsh was intercepted but Matty Dawson ran 70 metres to make a superb cover tackle.The Rams had numbers though and a fine flowing move to the corner saw Dale Morton go over.Dewsbury continued to press but good kick chase brought up the home side’s next chance … and they didn’t disappoint.Walsh’s kick was knocked dead by the Rams and after the drop out, Saints took the ball to the left and Jordan Turner offloaded to Mark Percival under pressure.The Rams hit back through Aaron Brown after Saints failed to deal with a kick along the floor – and then another kick saw Andy Kain go over and give the visitors the lead.Saints needed to start the second half strong and they did – Mark Percival weaving his way through the Rams’ defence from distance.Fages then showed a glimpse of what he is capable of. He made a superb break through sleight of foot to find Oli Davies. Seconds later another superb sidestep saw him cross in the corner.Jack Owens tagging on the extras from the touchline.Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook added a fantastic try on 60 minutes – made by Fages – before Kyle Trout replied with around 10 to go.But Saints underlined their second half dominance with a fine move polished off by Calvin Wellington.And there was time for Dougie Charnock to sneak over from dummy half right on the hooter.Match Summary:Saints:Tries: McCarthy-Scarsbrook (2), Percival (2), Fages, Wellington, Charnock, Goals: Walsh (1 from 2), Owens (2 from 3), Burns (2 from 2)Rams:Tries: Morton, Brown, Kain, TroutGoals: Sykes (1 from 4)Penalties:Saints: 3Rams: 2HT: 10-14FT: 38-18REF: G StokesATT: TBCTeams:Saints: 22. Jack Owens; 21. Matty Dawson, 3. Jordan Turner, 18. Dominique Peyroux, 4. Mark Percival; 6. Travis Burns, 7. Luke Walsh; 14. Lama Tasi, 9. James Roby, 10. Kyle Amor, 12. Jon Wilkin, 20. Joe Greenwood, 13. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook.Subs: 11. Atelea Vea, 15. Greg Richards, 16. Andre Savelio, 17. Luke Thompson, 19. Theo Fages, 25. Lewis Charnock, 26. Oliver Davies, 27. Jack Ashworth, 28. Morgan Knowles, 29. Ricky Bailey, 30. Calvin Wellington, 33. Jake Spedding, 34. Regan Grace.Rams: 3. Karl Pryce; 2. Dale Morton, 15. Jason Crookes, 4. Shane Grady, 5. Dalton Grant; 6. Paul Sykes, 22. Andy Kain; 8. Matt Groat, 9. Tom Hemingway, 24. Jack Teanby, 32. Kyle Trout, 16. Toby Adamson, 14. Luke Adamson.Subs: 10. Ryan Hepworth, 13. Aaron Brown, 17. Dom Speakman, 19. Nathan Conroy, 25. Joel Farrell, 27. Jason Muranka, 31. Ryan Wright.last_img read more