CAF’s Tailored Efundraising service reaches £1million mark

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies Digital Research / statistics Howard Lake | 10 March 2004 | News  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img CAF’s Tailored Efundraising service reaches £1million mark Over £1 million has now been donated online to charities through Charities Aid Foundation’s (CAF) Tailored Efundraising service. Launched in August 2002, Efundraising enables charities of all sizes toaccept secure, tax-effective credit/debit card and Direct Debit donationsfrom their own Web site, without the need for a specialised trading and banking service. It is now used by over 350 non-profit organisations. Individual donationsthrough the service have ranged from £5 to £10,000 and have been made from 100 countries including Australia, Belgium, the US, Canada and Japan. Advertisement The African Children’s Education Trust (A-CET) now receives “nearly 10%” of its income online through Efundraising. According to trustee David Stables: “As a small charity we are unable to afford what might betermed as direct or ‘face-to-face’ fundraising, so we feel we should justmake it as easy as possible to attract all potential donors. Setting upEfundraising was easy and virtually automatic, and the system suits usadmirably.”Efundraising links a charity’s Web site to secure donation pages which can betailored to fit in with the look and feel of its own site. Working alongside e-commerce solutions company World Pay, CAF handles all the administration on behalf of the charity, from designing the donation pages, to processing gifts and reclaiming tax fromthe Inland Revenue. On average 76% of donations through Efundraising aremade via Gift Aid compared to a sector average of 28%.As well as UK sterling, charities can appeal for gifts in US dollars or Euros. Further currencies can be added to their donation pages on request.CAF’s system allows charities to view statements of donations online. In addition CAF provides donor records and hard copy reports. CAF says that “charities also get to view donations being made through their Web sites in real time.” Efundraising includes an online tracking facility that enables charities to identify from which sites or e-mails their donations have originated.last_img read more

Mary Boyle’s sister to meet with MPs in Westminster

first_img Previous articleMagee’s bow out of French Open Super SeriesNext articleAlmost €24 million paid out to community organisations in Donegal admin 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic By admin – October 23, 2015 The twin sister of Mary Boyle who went missing in 1977 will visit Westminster Tuesday next for a series of meetings led by MP Jeffrey Donaldson to address Garda failure and cross-border crime.A number of families have been invited to London to discuss the issues.It’s believed Ann Doherty will also reiterate her claim to know the identity of Mary Boyles alleged killer during this meeting.Mary Boyle went missing from her grandparents farm at Cashelard near Ballyshannon on the 18th of March 1977.Journalist Gemma O’Doherty says this will put the case on an international platform, in the hope that justice will be achieved:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/gemraw.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Pinterest Twitter Facebook 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North WhatsAppcenter_img Twitter Mary Boyle’s sister to meet with MPs in Westminster WhatsApp Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Google+ Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Homepage BannerNews Facebook Pinterestlast_img read more

Roos Weers comes back from injury scare to help lead No. 1 Syracuse to 4-2 win

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 18, 2015 at 7:23 pm Contact Sam: [email protected] | @Sam4TR Roos Weers, Syracuse’s leading goal-scorer, was lying on her left side at the top of the circle. She’d fallen after running into a stick and hadn’t moved for almost a minute. As the trainer came out to assist Weers, she grabbed her left knee and tried to extend it.“I twisted it and it felt really bad,” Weers said. “…I was a little bit afraid.”It was the same knee which Weers said she had surgery on two-and-a-half years ago.Just under a minute into the second half, Weers limped back to the bench, gingerly using her knee on the way.Weers wouldn’t return for nearly 10 minutes as she went through tests on the sideline. When she did come back in, with the Orange trailing 1-0 and the team’s perfect season in jeopardy, she didn’t waste time. Within minutes of re-entering, Weers had assisted on the game-tying goal and scored the first go-ahead goal for Syracuse (15-0, 5-0 Atlantic Coast) as the Orange defeated Princeton (7-5, 4-2 I and set a record for the longest winning streak in program history.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It showed mental toughness,” midfielder Alyssa Manley said. “(Weers) had that happen, she laid on the ground, was taken off the field then (helped) put in a goal right away.”Two minutes, 19 seconds after she returned, Weers intercepted the ball about five yards from the top-left point of the circle and looked up. She and forward Emma Russell made eye contact.“I knew she was going to send it in,” Russell said.Weers belted in a long pass and Russell extended the blade of her stick, deflecting the ball into the goal’s upper netting and tying the game at one.Almost five minutes later, off a penalty corner, Weers spun and chopped the ball into the bottom left corner to give Syracuse, at the time, a 2-1 lead.Stands to sidelines, energy ran high all afternoon. Princeton head coach Kristen Holmes-Winn yelled “Pressure!” over and over, the Syracuse sideline, particularly assistant coach Allan Law, vocally disagreed with several calls and both benches received a warning to step back and quiet down.In a game with perfection on the line, players were also animated. Forward Emma Lamison left the circle several times with her hands up after a penalty call went against the Orange. After Princeton drew a penalty corner, Lies Lagerweij put her hands on her head and Weers stared at the referee with her hands up.When Weers left the game, head coach Ange Bradley brought in Liz Sack, one of her most-used substitutes, to play defense.With Weers on the sideline, Sack herself fell when she brought the ball in on the attack and Princeton defender Elise Wong tried to steal the ball, but ended up taking Sack’s legs from underneath her, sending her sprawling onto her back.Physicality was a theme throughout the afternoon. A referee shouted at Syracuse midfielder Serra Degnan to stop “pushing” Princeton players, SU midfielder Laura Hurff fell backward as if stunned when she was hit in the circle and several players had to take a moment to shake out hands or legs when the ball hit them.“I’m just happy everybody came out injury-free,” Bradley said.For a moment, it looked like Weers wouldn’t be able to have the impact she eventually had. She ripped off a garment covering her left knee late in the game. After the goal and the assist, Syracuse’s leader in points ran up the field.“When (Weers) said that she was feeling pain, I was worried that she was going to be injured, like a serious injury,” Manley said. “But (it wasn’t). I was glad…she could go back onto the field.” Commentslast_img read more