Mississippi bishop announces local option for same-sex blessings

first_img Comments (13) Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC February 12, 2013 at 2:47 pm I attended a South Carolina private girls college my freshman year (1972…indeed, another troubling time, remember forced bussing?) only to be teased for being from Mississippi…dumb, pregnant and barefoot was the talk of all women MISSISSIPPI. I smiled for a few months, then reminded them that I was taught in a Public school that South Carolina was the 1st state to secede from the Union. Is history just repeating itself once again? Bishop Gray cares!! His undying belief: thoughtful prayer to the GOOD LORD above (isn’t this what love is?), followed by ACTION w/ feelings; his sole interest is in the great diocese of Mississippi struggling to remain united in Christ’s welcoming grace. We have survived nearly 200 years…with Duncan Gray as our leader, we will march forward. As Brother Faulkner said: ..”we will not merely endure, …we will survive.”. Pray for PEACE. February 5, 2013 at 12:17 pm As a former communicant in the Diocese of Mississippi and an Episcopal clergyman, I am proud of Bishop Gray’s courage, one, in light of what is doubtless to be a troubling decision for some, but more importantly for his courage, two, in responding to the work of the Spirit in finally recognizing Her presence in the sacredness of the union of two persons. Given the Diocese of Mississippi’s work in civil rights in my home state, this decision continues a bravery and witness to the Gospel that characterized our church in the 1960s, but which has been slow to come in discussions of human sexuality. What troubles me is that some view Bishop Gray’s decision as a political one, bowing to some sort of public or societal pressure, rather than one guided by a deeply rooted understanding of scripture. Instead of darkening the light of Christ in an already dim world, Bishop Gray’s actions take that light out from under the bushel and unashamedly allow it to shine, brightening that dimness with a grace and a hope reflective of the Gospel, indeed true to scripture, not in opposition to it. Blessings to Bishop Gray and to the people of the Diocese of Mississippi; may they both grow in strength as they witness the working of the Holy Spirit. February 6, 2013 at 7:33 pm What continues to be ignored is the fact that conservatives are increasingly wondering how much longer there will be a place for them in TEC. Mr. Caldwell mentioned ‘no one is being forced to do anything’. I remember all too well some previous “conscience clauses” and how long those promises lasted. Bishop Gray promised he would not do what he just did. Do you see why conservatives might not trust his promise now? February 5, 2013 at 10:32 pm One word, “Amen” !! Human Sexuality, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Richard C. Johnson says: Burl Salmon says: Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing February 12, 2013 at 10:31 am As someone who is gay, I can assure the doubters out there, that I was born this way. Better stated, that this is how God created me. I no more “chose” my sexuality than any heterosexual chooses theirs. Mine is not a “lifestyle” – it is a LIFE. I applaud the Bishop as his decision is an example of living the “reason” pillar of TEC. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET February 6, 2013 at 5:07 pm The fact remains, Bishop Gray is doing what he told the conservatives of his diocese that he would not do. I believe they are feeling betrayed. I wonder what effect this might have on those parishes in DSC still discerning if there is a place within TEC for them? You say no one is being forced to do anything. Not now, but if I were a conservative I would wonder just how long that will last.Unfortunately, Mr. Caldwell, my experience of the intolerance towards the conservatives of my parish has caused me deep sadness. I observed them mocked, belittled, and accused of bigotry. Seems to me we are very inclusive church, unless you happen to be a conservative. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group walter combs says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Elizabeth E. Hanson says: Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ronald J. Caldwell says: Bishop Duncan Gray addresses the Annual Council of the Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi on Feb. 2 in Jackson. Photo: Jim Carrington[Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi] In his annual address to the 186th Annual Council in Jackson, Diocese of Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray III announced a process that can used by parishes and missions which can lead to an authorization by the bishop to allow clergy to perform a liturgy of same-sex blessings until the next General Convention of the Episcopal Church in 2015.By canon, priests have the authority of all matters of worship in their own congregation, but due to the “sensitive nature of this decision, I am simply requiring serious and prayerful consultation with the lay leadership of the congregation,” said Gray to the delegates, alternates and clergy gathered at the opening service of council at the Jackson Convention Center Complex.Citing the Episcopal Church’s Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music declaration that the blessing is not marriage, Gray reiterated that this liturgy for blessing is not a sacrament of marriage. “I will take the Standing Liturgical Commission at its word.  The State of Mississippi will not authorize such a rite and my own conscience would not accept it [if it were a marriage],” said Gray.Gray further stated that “no priest, no vestry, no congregation will be asked to do anything that violates their conscience.”In order for a congregation to receive an exception to the ban on the blessing of same-sex couples, a congregation must petition the bishop and certify in that request four areas of process that were undertaken by the clergy and lay leadership.Indicate the process of prayer and study that was undertaken;Describe how they see its use as beneficial to the mission of the church in their community;Describe the process for preparing a couple for this blessing and how the congregation would show its support for the couple; andMake a commitment to report back on their experience in time for input at General Convention in 2015.At the completion of the process a congregation may do one of three things: nothing; differentiate themselves from the decision with a statement; or petition the bishop to lift the ban.Gray said he has formed a small task force to work with him on questions and issues that may arise during a congregation’s processing of a petition.In acknowledgement of the seriousness of his position change (Gray voted against the trial use of the liturgy for the blessing of same-sex relationships at General Convention while all Mississippi deputies voted for the authorization), Gray said: “I am well aware of the extraordinary diversity of emotion that this decision will evoke. This announcement will delight some of you. For others this will be experienced as horror and betrayal. I recognize both realities. . . For those who feel betrayed, I will accept your anger. I trust that I have earned your respect over 13 years and that we can find ways to talk and move forward.”Gray also said that he chose to implement this change in policy “so that deep emotions that this action evokes can be borne by me, [the] one who has walked with you through so much over these last 13 years — and not by someone who must address it at the outset of his or her new ministry with you,” Gray said referring to his announced retirement in 2015 and the calling of a bishop coadjutor who will take Gray’s place.Gray referred to St. Paul’s metaphor of seeing through a glass darkly as we attempt to ascertain God’s truth. “Each of us has distorted perceptions of truth, and we need one another — our unique gifts, our unique perspectives — to give us a fuller, but always imperfect, vision of God’s truth and God’s purposes.“We’ve still got work to do together. And for all that we’ve fought over and for all that we’ve disagreed about, I cannot imagine a people with whom I would rather do God’s work.”— The Rev. Scott Lenoir is the editor of The Mississippi Episcopalian. Rector Washington, DC February 7, 2013 at 9:29 pm A friend of mine who grew up in Mississippi forwarded this article to me. I don’t perceive Bishop Gray as betraying promises he made almost 9 years ago, but rather as someone who has thought about things with an open mind. I grew up in Baltimore, MD, where I spent grades 1 – 12 at a small Episcopal boys’ school, St. Paul’s. We went to chapel every day, and the school itself, while conservative in nature, instilled in its students the golden rule, integrity, and honor. It was a school that valued mental, physical, and spiritual growth. I attended a small, conservative college in Virginia that lived by similar values. I don’t know if I believe that Jesus is the son of God or if there really is a God, but I do believe in Love, that there is good and evil in the world, and that most people have a conscience that guides them to do their best and to do good. I continue to attend church in Washington, DC, at the Church of the Epiphany, because I believe there is a nurturing spirit in our Church. For those that feel homosexuality is a sin and that scripture says it is so, I urge them to do more study, for one’s sexuality is a gift from God, or whatever you perceive God to be. It took me a fairly long time to come to grips with that, but fortunately I did and as a result of accepting who I am, I have found strength, courage, and an ability to achieve great success without harboring fear or guilt. It also led me to a monogamous relationship that has lasted 20 years and hopefully, will last many more to come. To various commentators above, I suggest not worrying about trusting Bishop Gray, but taking his cue and learning more about why he chose to do what he did. I suspect it is not out of political means, but out of study, soul searching, and coming to a deeper understanding of all members of God’s great community. As I read the comments, I wonder why those who label themselves as Conservatives are fearful of change. Were you dismayed when the 1928 prayer book and the 1940 hymnal were replaced? Does singing out, praying with voice, passing the peace or holding hands during the Lord’s prayer make you feel uneasy? Our current liturgy is more life affirming and the hymnal more diverse and inclusive. All of this is positive if one is open-minded and willing to embrace new ways of expressing one’s relationship with God and with the community. The mission of the Church is to grow. The way we learn and the way we work all change over time. The way we worship and the way we see the world and all those in it change too. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Same-Sex Blessings Featured Events Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA February 5, 2013 at 5:42 pm I applaud Bishop Gray for his reasonable, careful, and open approach to a very delicate issue in the deep south (I live in Alabama). He is not forcing anybody to do anything, merely giving parishes the right to deal with the issue of the blessing of same-gender unions as they wish. Parishes and missions are often extended families. Families need to talk, discuss the issues before them. This will not go away. It is here to stay. It will have to be dealt with sooner or later. I imagine most local churches will turn down the blessing. If they do so after honest, open and fair debate, then so be it! But let’s face it as a family. We have all lost family arguments but we didn’t leave the family.We deep southerners are too often behind the curve on matters of human rights. Here in Alabama we had to have a Yankee come to us in the civil rights years to show us how Christians should behave. He gave his life for us. We now revere Blessed Jonathan Daniels.What Bishop Gray is saying is let’s not hide from the hard issues of human life any more. I say bravo.The exact opposite to Bishop Gray’s approach is the case of South Carolina. There, for years the conservative leadership of the diocese relentlessly attacked the Episcopal Church and blocked out the local defenders of the church. Only one side was allowed to make its case. After years of this, local parishes and missions were suddenly put on the spot to choose between the conservative leadership and the national church. The majority chose the former. No wonder. It was a revolution from the top down.Gray is calling for addressing a serious social issue starting with the people in the pews. I would choose Gray’s way any day. Otherwise, we get the disaster of South Carolina. walter combs says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Sally Neville says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Mississippi bishop announces local option for same-sex blessings Michael Kirchner says: February 5, 2013 at 9:47 am Although we are all welcome sinners in the church I do not find the church aplace that should condone this immoral institution. All through-out scripturethe Word states that homosexuality is an abomination. I will leave that upto you for your common sense. We should not change for the world, but bea light in the dark world. Listen to God and act as Noah did. We should buildthe boat and be ready for the big flood. In other words let us not conform tothis world, but rather transform the world. I will be in prayer because I havemany liberal friends who stand up for individual rights. I am totally not inagreement with adding illness to an already sick world. Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS February 6, 2013 at 6:24 pm As a member of the Episcopal Church in Lexington, KY, this whole issue is saddening. I believe God is love, and people love who they love. There is plenty of evidence that gays/lesbians are born the way they are. Why would someone choose to have a characteristic that people condemn? People are still cherry picking from Leviticus , “A man who lays down with another man….etc.” That law was there because back then, they believed that the man produced the baby, and the woman was just a baby incubator, therefore, they made that law (and the law against masturbation) to prevent “spilling the seed.” I learned this from my own Rector.Besides, Leviticus has plenty of rules that we people don’t do: If you eat Shellfish, it’s a violation. If you get a tattoo, it’s a violation. Adulterers are supposed to be killed. We don’t do that. I just don’t pick and choose what I will obey.I am not surprised the Bishop in Mississippi is in a dilemma. This is the same state that finally ratified the Amendment of the Constitution that got rid of Slavery in 1995. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ronald J. Caldwell says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. By Scott LenoirPosted Feb 4, 2013 Rector Collierville, TN February 10, 2013 at 9:46 am Mr. Combs I just do not see how conservatives can see this move of Bishop Gray as a threat or a danger. No parish or mission is being required to address the issue of same gender unions. I imagine most local churches will simply ignore the subject. I am certain they would here in Alabama. But there may be some parishes that wish to consider whether to allow the blessing (not marriage) of same gender unions. Under Gray’s plan they will be permitted to consider it but must go through a rigorous process before they can petition for a lift of the ban. I think this is the right approach to dealing with contentious social issues. It is better for the extended family to grapple with issues as a community. It is reasonable, common sensical, and democratic approach to how the Episcopal Church deals with the changing social mores of modern American society. Anyway, I just do not see how this harms anyone. Youth Minister Lorton, VA February 4, 2013 at 9:30 pm I was raised in the Diocese of West Texas under the guidance of Bishop Everett Jones who, no doubt, is weeping in heaven over the disgusting rhetoric and leadership of a now very divided and heartbroken members (former member in this case) of the Episcopal Church. The church has split from Biblical teachings in supporting/condoning same sex relationships (that are in no way a Christian Marriage which can ONLY be between a man and a woman). Your current presiding bishop (Katherine Jefferts Schori) is hell bent on destroying/dividing a once unified and beautiful means of worship. I am surprised at the support she has received and am sure that part of it has to do with the Episcopal clergy running scared of losing their long earned retirement benefits. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Terri Bey says: Dawson Nash says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service February 4, 2013 at 7:16 pm Although I may personally agree with his decision. I imagine the conservatives that have remained loyal to TEC are feeling a complete betrayal by his acitons. In his address to the diocesan council back in 2004 he said, “I do not intend to change the policies of my Episcopal predecessors in matters of sexual morality. I will not authorize in this diocese the blessing of same gender unions, nor ordain unmarried non-celibate heterosexual or homosexual persons”. I believe so far the conservative faction in Miss. has remained loyal to TEC based largely on assurances that this would not happen. I shudder to think that another exodus awaits this church that is so quickly shrinking. I also want to say that until 2003 my parish was growing. Since then we have dwindled to the point that both we and the parish in the next town over are talking about closing our doors. Pretty depressing! Rector Belleville, IL Emma Young says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis walter combs says: last_img read more

Video: From Cairo to London, interfaith art brings message of…

first_imgVideo: From Cairo to London, interfaith art brings message of peace By Matthew DaviesPosted Sep 4, 2013 Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Episcopal News Service] The arts may be one of the most effective mediums for building bridges, says the Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler, the Episcopal priest responsible for the journey of 25 life-size painted fiberglass donkeys from Cairo to St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, where they will be on display in the south nave aisle until Sept. 23.Now in its fifth year, the Caravan arts exhibition brings together Western and Egyptian artists, both Christian and Muslim, to promote a message of peace.Chandler, an Episcopal Church mission partner who has served as a priest in Cairo for the past 10 years, sees the exhibition as an opportunity to deepen understanding across cultures and religions.“We’re passionate about interfaith friendships and we’ve found that the arts, in many ways, is a catalyst for that,” Chandler told ENS on Aug. 30 during an interview at the launch of the exhibition, which is titled In Peace and With Compassion.The donkey was chosen for the exhibition because in both Christian and Muslim faith traditions it represents peace, Chandler explained. “In a sense, these artists are saying that the way forward for us is in peace. The other thing the donkey represents is compassion. It’s a beast of burden and the poorest of the poor in Egypt use the donkey.”This year’s exhibition comes at a time when Egypt faces ongoing political turmoil and a rise in sectarian violence.“Contrary often to what we see in the news about what is coming out of Egypt at this time, which is somewhat tragic, these artists are saying no, there is another alternative – the way forward as far as we see it is in peace and with compassion,” Chandler said.It’s the first time the initiative has traveled outside of Egypt and the exhibition at St. Paul’s is sponsored by the Embassy of Switzerland in Egypt, and supported by the British Council. Chandler said that St. Paul’s Cathedral was considered for the exhibition because it is a sacred space known globally for both its role in the arts and its commitment to interfaith relations.“St. Paul’s is right in the heart of a very cosmopolitan city where we are all trying to live together and to be loyal to our future that we’re sharing,” said the Rev. Canon Mark Oakley, chancellor of St. Paul’s Cathedral, “and I think that is the strength of this exhibition – Muslim and Christian seeking to be loyal to the future of their country through working harmoniously and creatively, and I can’t think of any better model for our own city here.”The donkeys were first exhibited in May at St. John’s Church in Cairo, where Chandler has just stepped down as rector after 10 years. They were then placed in strategic public locations throughout Cairo before about a third of them made their way to St. Paul’s.Oakley said that he hopes people who visit the exhibition will find the donkeys “beautiful and I hope they will remember the people of Egypt at the moment and I hope it will help them reflect on how they in their own localized life … will think again about the human and about the things we share and about the future we share and how we need to … be almost recklessly generous in our friendships.”Following the exhibition, the donkeys will be auctioned by Sotheby’s, with all profits going to Egyptian charities that serve the poor, regardless of their faith.Chandler said that in addition to the high-level art, it’s important that the initiative influences the poor. In Egypt, “we’ve identified 25 charities that are grassroots in their orientation, that work both on the Christian and Muslim side, serving the poor regardless of their creed.”Further information about Caravan is available here.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Tags Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Video New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

Lex Mathews, pioneer of North Carolina social ministries, remembered

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By Summerlee WalterPosted Apr 8, 2014 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA The Rev Garrett Wingfield says: Rector Bath, NC People The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group March 3, 2017 at 5:36 pm I just read Judy’s article from the Church Pension Fund and wanted to share this story with her. In 1963 I was in my first church assignment at St John’s, Silbee TX. At that time my wife and I had 6 children, 3 sons & 3 daughters. On the first Bishop’s visitation, Bishop Milton Richardson was accompanied by his wife Gene. At lunch after the Confirmation, Gene said to me, “Garrett I have not seen female acolytes before in this Diocese. I think you are breaking new ground.” I replied, “I did not realize that, with three daughters in the family it just seemed to be the right thing to do.” Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ron Caldwell says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Rev. Lex Mathews, director of Christian social ministries for the Diocese of North Carolina, 1975-1985. Photo from the archives of the Diocese of North Carolina.[Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina] The Diocese of North Carolina recently gathered to commemorate and be inspired by the legacy of the Rev. Lex Mathews, director of Christian social ministries for the diocese from 1975 until his untimely death in 1985.On April 5, people from across the Southeast came together at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Raleigh, North Carolina, to share stories about the man who brought hospice care to North Carolina, inspired dozens of feeding ministries, established a scholarship for women entering the workforce, shepherded the founding of the Episcopal Farmworker Ministry, and encouraged the creation of local outreach ministries that have since become the backbone of the diocese’s presence in local communities.The oral history event, organized by diocesan historiographer the Rev. Brooks Graebner and diocesan archivist Lynn Hoke, included six members of the Mathews family and three bishops. The event was recorded to add to the diocese’s historical record.The day began with Graebner contextualizing the historical significance of Mathews’ work, which encouraged congregations to engage in local outreach ministries and led to the formation of church-based outreach committees, a fairly novel idea in the 1970s. In opposition to an Episcopal Church initiative to address the social unrest of the 1960s by bypassing dioceses and local churches with national grants made directly to local community organizations, Mathews called on North Carolina’s 1976 annual convention to stop relying on supposed experts to dictate social ministries.“Good Christian theology tells us that man’s need to love is greater than his need to be loved,” he told the convention. “Now, change that so it reads ‘to help rather than to be helped.’ When we ask the Atlantas, the Washingtons or whatever to be the helper, then we cut the light right out from under the would-be helpers in our own backyards.”Mathews’ efforts to stem the alienation between the broader Episcopal Church and many of the diocese’s congregations — and between congregations and the work happening in their communities — led him in 1974 to propose a new position. He called his idea “Community Consultant and Instigator for Disoriented Young People,” a characteristically Mathews phrase, Graebner assured attendees. The position evolved into the director of the Committee for Christian Social Ministries, but Mathews’ original vision of “the community address[ing] itself to its own problem utilizing its own resources on a very low budget instead of wringing its hands, cursing young people and waiting on some sort of overnight magic cure in the form of a government grant” remained the defining characteristic of the group’s work.Scott Evans Hughes, former president of the Episcopal Church Women in North Carolina, recalled a time Mathews encouraged her to address a local problem. In 1979 she was on her way to a meeting at the diocesan office when she drove by a development project and wondered who cared for the animals displaced by the construction.“I realized I did,” she said.With Mathews’ encouragement, Hughes educated herself about environmental issues and eventually brought her concerns before the 1982 Triennial Meeting of Episcopal Church Women. According to Hughes, it was one of the first times the Episcopal Church took up the environmental cause.“Lex encouraged me, supported me and charmed me into doing more than I ever thought I could,” she explained.Mathews’ active role in encouraging lay people, and especially women, to pursue causes about which they were passionate was a theme that ran throughout the day’s stories.The Rt. Rev. Anne Hodges-Copple and Judy Wright Mathews remember Lex Mathews. Photo: Summerlee Walter.The Rt. Rev. Anne Hodges-Copple, bishop suffragan of North Carolina, recalled a 1982 meeting she had with the Rt. Rev. Robert Estill, former bishop of North Carolina, while she was still a community organizer working in rural Kentucky. When Fraser enthusiastically described to her the principles of community organizing that Mathews taught him, Hodges-Copple began to think there might be a place for her in the priesthood in North Carolina.“Lex was a midwife in showing and leading women into their own ministries, especially lay ministries,” she said. “He believed in the capacity of each one of us to embody Jesus in an authentic way.”Panelists also described the ways Mathews’ contributions continue to motivate change in North Carolina. The Episcopal Farmworker Ministry he helped to found in Dunn provides liturgical ministry, English as a Second Language classes, pesticide education, transportation to medical care and donations of food, clothing, and toiletry kits to 3,500 migrant workers each year. Good Shepherd’s Shepherd’s Table soup kitchen, one of approximately 45 local feeding ministries Mathews inspired, continues to serve hot lunches to 350 people each week day. The Lex Mathews Scholarship for Women has distributed $270,000 in scholarships to women entering college as non-traditional students, and the hospice network in North Carolina owes its existence to Mathews’ dedicated efforts in the late 1970s to recruit the right people to incorporate the program.Six members of the Mathews family attended the commemorative event held in Lex Mathews’ honor. Photo: Karla Joy Towle.Mathews’ wife, Judy Wright Mathews, was thrilled by the outpouring of love and respect for her late husband and was glad to see that his work continues.“This gives me a chance to see the work done for the marginalized people reinforced,” she said before advocating for the work yet to be done. “I think there’s more things we can do. The trends in the United States now make it more difficult for these marginalized people.”For Hughes, it is clear that Mathews’ example will continue to inspire outreach ministries in North Carolina.“When Bishop Curry asked us to ‘go do’ at this year’s convention, that was Lex.”— Summerlee Walter is the communications coordinator for the Diocese of North Carolina. April 8, 2014 at 4:46 pm In our class of 1960 at Virginia Seminary, Lex was the one we turned to when we wanted counsel. His counseling included a lot of good humor and foolishness that was very healing. He and I often drove back and forth between Virginia and Alabama. Those long drives which could have been tedious were instead delightful; full of conversation, laughter and a deep communion of our spirits. He had a special way of making one’s spirt sparkle with thanksgiving. – Doug Carpenter Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Lex Mathews, pioneer of North Carolina social ministries, remembered March 13, 2015 at 11:46 am Reading about Lex, Judy and in particular Doug Carpenter’s response to “The Letter From The Birmingham Jail” bring back so many good, important and cherished memories from those years in North Carolina, Virginia and the Province. This is a way of saying hello to all my good friends after so many years. Can I also add that included in those memories are wonderful ones of my dear friend, Jim “Cracker” Walter and his many stories he told of his escapades with cousin, Lex in Alabama. We all lived through such important and crucial times. Warm regards and love, Waite Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 10, 2014 at 5:23 pm I knew Lex Mathews at FSU, as well. While I was there (1967-1972) I got to be the first woman lector in the Diocese of Florida, first female President of Canterbury House and the first female president of the University Religious Council. In those days, it was revolutionary! Lex paved the way for equal rights for women, long before others understood the Gospel imperative! Also,he was fortunate to have an Assisting Chaplain, John Talbird, Jr. who walked along side of Lex and his ministry. Lex, continue to rest in the loving arms of Jesus as you need to and continue the unbinding of people’s lives! Joyce+ Waite Maclin says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Douglas M. Carpenter says: Obituary, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI April 9, 2014 at 9:07 am I wish I had known about this in advance. I would have been there for sure. I knew Lex Mathews in the “in between” years, between Alabama and North Carolina. He had a profound influence on my life. I was a lowly college student at Florida State disillusioned with the religion of my youth and floundering around for new meaning in life. Lex showed me how to combine faith with social action. In an era of great turmoil, he had a clear vision of justice and a will to carry it out, even against the odds; and he did so with grace and humor. That has been the guide of my life ever since. Besides, he officiated at my wedding at the student chapel in Tallahassee in 1966. In two years, my wife and I plan to return to that place for our golden anniversary. I know Lex will be there too. — Ron Caldwell (student at FSU, 1963-66, 1968-71). Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (5) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Rev. Joyce W. Holmes says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Liberia Bishop Jonathan Hart heads West Africa’s internal province

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Adapted from an AllAfrica.com report] Bishop Jonathan Hart of the Episcopal Church of Liberia has been enthroned as archbishop of the Internal Province of West Africa (IpWA) in the Church of the Province of West Africa (CPWA).Hart succeeds Bishop Solomon Tilewa Johnson of The Gambia who died in office on Jan. 21, 2014.Hart was elected on May 1, 2014 by the Electoral College of the IpWA in the St. Augustine Anglican Church in Freetown, Sierra Leone. He is also the dean of the CPWA. Hart now assumes the role of having oversight of the Anglican Communion bishops from Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Cape Verde, Sierra Leone, The Gambia, Cameroon and Liberia.Hart was consecrated as bishop of the Episcopal Church of Liberia on March 2, 2008.Liberia President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, in a congratulatory message, said: “We and the Episcopal denomination in Liberia have not the slightest doubt that you will measure up to the task of your new assignment considering services you have rendered to the flock here in the Diocese of Liberia and your astute ecumenical standing within the communities of the Christian faith.”Archbishop of the Church of the Province of West Africa Daniel Yinka Sarfo pledged to work with Hart to build on the legacies of their predecessors.Sarfo, also the current Anglican bishop of Kumasi in Ghana, reiterated the wish that the two internal provinces of West Africa should eventually become autonomous provinces of the Anglican Communion during their tenure.Hart’s enthronement service was held at the Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity on Sunday, July 6, and attended by more than 15 other bishops of the province, including Sarfo, as well as international guests from the United States and England. Vice President Joseph Boakai among other national dignitaries was also present. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Liberia Bishop Jonathan Hart heads West Africa’s internal province Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By C. Winnie Saywah-JimmyPosted Jul 9, 2014 Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Africa, Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Featured Events Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Anglican Communion Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CAlast_img read more

Pakistan: Security guard dies foiling Peshawar terror attack

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 September 6, 2016 at 6:54 pm So nice to see the word “martyr” applied to someone who gave his life so that others could live, rather than one who took innocent lives. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Asia AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Pakistan: Security guard dies foiling Peshawar terror attack Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL center_img Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Melanie R Barbarito says: Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Anglican Communion News Service] A security guard at a church in a Christian colony in Peshawar foiled a major terror attack on Sept. 2 before being killed in a subsequent gun-battle. Four suicide bombers entered the colony, on the city’s Warsak Road, at 5.50 a.m. local time. The security guard, Samuel Masih, raised the alarm, alerting nearby police and army forces. He then challenged the terrorists and was killed as a result of gunfire.Full article. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN By Gavin DrakePosted Sep 6, 2016 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments (1) Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Pilgrims bear witness to racial reconciliation at Georgia lynching site

first_imgPilgrims bear witness to racial reconciliation at Georgia lynching site TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Belleville, IL A stone and bronze plaque unveiled Oct. 22 in front of the Douglass Theatre in Macon, Georgia, marks the location where a lynch mob discarded the body of their victim John “Cockey” Glover in 1922. The plaque was unveiled during a pilgrimage by 175 people sponsored by the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta’s Beloved Community Commission for Dismantling Racism. Photo: Hala Hess White[Diocese of Atlanta] In an effort to confront racism and heal from it, 175 people made a pilgrimage Saturday, Oct. 22 to Macon and marked where a 1922 lynch mob dumped the body of John “Cockey” Glover.“Telling the truth is the only path to real healing,” Catherine Meeks told the crowd assembled inside the Douglass Theatre, a historic landmark in Macon established by one of the city’s first African-American entrepreneurs. “People want to say that that the truth will lead to division, but it’s the lies that keep us divided.”Meeks, a former professor of African-American studies at nearby Mercer University, led the pilgrimage on behalf of the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta’s Beloved Community Commission for Dismantling Racism, which she chairs.The pilgrimage grew out of the commission’s four-year effort to remove barriers to seeing God’s face in everyone. The commission last month hosted Alabama death penalty lawyer and “Just Mercy” author Bryan Stevenson, who drew a packed crowd at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Atlanta. “When you go to spaces where there has been abuse, trauma and horror, and do something reflective, you can begin to respond to the trauma,” he said.The daylong pilgrimage began before dawn at Meeks’ home church, St. Augustine’s Episcopal in Morrow, where buses filled with people of various colors, ages, cultures, denominations and religions. Most were from the Atlanta diocese; others came from Alabama, Tennessee, North Carolina, Massachusetts and California. Some are planning similar commemorations around race-related violence where they live.In general, those on the pilgrimage were seeking to change the narrative of racially-charged violence—including modern-day police killings of unarmed people of color—by bearing witness publically to its wrongness, sanctifying the lives of all people and honoring Glover and others as martyrs.“Why am I as a white person 50 times safer walking down the street than a black person?”  asked Chris Wight of Oak View, California, who works at a ministry devoted to social justice and was in Georgia to visit a similar one and support the pilgrimage. “In my local area, native peoples’ lands were built over by freeways and their histories demolished. We need to look at true histories, not whitewashed history.”Recalling a violent deathThe body of lynching victim John “Cockey” Glover was dumped in front of  the historic Douglass Theatre in Macon, Georgia, by a lynch mob in 1922. Built by African- American entrepreneur Charles Douglass, the theater was a popular gathering place for the community and Glover’s body was left there “to make a statement,” said Theatre Director Gina Ward. Photo: Hala Hess WhiteAt the Macon theater, the group celebrated Eucharist with Atlanta Bishop Robert C. Wright, who said that racial reconciliation isn’t about guilt or defensiveness—it’s critical to loving others like Jesus loves. “We ground what is and could be in this common cup,” he said.The sermon by Simeon Bruce, a fellow in Atlanta’s Episcopal Service Corps, urged listeners that remembering must be followed by repenting from judging others and learning from our mistakes.For the offertory anthem, a Clark Atlanta University Quartet soloist sang the protest ballad “Strange Fruit”: Black body swinging in the Southern breeze /Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.The service continued outside the theater, where on Aug. 1, 1922, Glover’s lynched body had been dumped “to make a statement,” said Gina Ward, the theater’s director.Local historian Andrew Manis said Glover appeared at a poolroom drunk and waving a pistol, and when law enforcement responded, he fatally shot a white policeman and two white customers. He went into hiding as police searched and harassed the African-American community and the Ku Klux Klan put a $100 bounty on him. The Douglass Theatre, which had been built by African-American entrepreneur Charles Douglass, usually was a safe place for the community, but during the manhunt, Douglass himself received death threats.As an American, Glover was supposed to have the constitutional right to equal protection under the law and a fair trial, guaranteed by the 14th Amendment passed in 1868. Still, in the years following the Civil War, rights were not applied equally. From 1886 to 1992, after the end of Reconstruction, at least 15 people were lynched in middle Georgia.Two days after the poolroom shootings, Glover was apprehended 50 miles north in Griffin, but his police transport ended before he got to Macon.“Just north of the city, they were stopped by a mob of an estimated 400 angry white men, who grabbed up Glover from the back floorboard of the car. [They] emptied shotguns into his body, left him lying face up in a small swampy ditch … then decided to dump the body in the back of a truck and take it into Macon,” Manis wrote in “Macon Black and White, An Unutterable Separation in the American Century.”In downtown Macon, the biggest city in central Georgia then and now, “the mob jerked Glover’s remains out of the truck and dumped it in the street, where his clothing was cut to shreds and sold as souvenirs,” Manis wrote. “Later, the nearly nude body was dumped in the foyer of the Douglass Theatre. Someone shouted, ‘Get the gasoline,’ but the police arrived just before the body could be incinerated inside the theater. By that time hundreds of whites had converged on the area and overwhelmed police. Pushing and shoving, many shouted, ‘Burn him!’ or ‘Hang him up.’ Others yelled, ‘Let’s get a look at him.’”On the spot where that happened, the service Saturday continued under a bright autumn sun.Wright unveiled a stone and bronze marker embedded on the ground with Glover’s name and “martyred brothers and unknown others” lynched from 1886 to 1922 in middle Georgia, with the date and seal of the Atlanta diocese. Although almost a century has passed since Glover’s death, one purpose of the pilgrimage was to present lynchings in the context of injustice toward people of color, which many see continuing today in instances where police fatally shoot unarmed African-American men.The Rev. Kimberly Jackson, an associate rector at All Saints Episcopal Church in Atlanta, led a litany of remembrance.“We remember these martyrs who were targeted by racial terrorism and stripped of their humanity,” she said before reciting the names of Glover; James Moore; Owen Ogletree; Charles Gibson; Jack Hilsman; Charles Powell; William Bostick; Alonzo Green and his unnamed son; Paul Jones; Willie Singleton; Amos Gibson; John Goolsby; Henry Etheridge; John Gilham; and those unknown. “We lament the historical silence that surrounds their lynching and buries the truth,” she recited.“Today we commit to break the silence, to uncover the hard truths of our history and to face the legacy of racial terrorism,” the congregation responded.“We are poets and prophets, protestors and protectors, committed to dismantling racism in our homes, churches, schools, and beyond… Let us go forth in the world until justice, real justice, comes,” concluded Jackson.One of the first offerings was a cluster of white sage. It came from Wight’s front yard, a sacred herb for native people in his part of California and his way of marking the sanctity of life across cultures.Recognizing the civic and personal importanceThe event attracted the blessing of the Macon-Bibb County government, which declared Oct. 22, 2016, “Reclaiming Hope through Remembering Day.”“No resolution or ordinance means more than what we are to do today,” Elaine Lucas, a local elected official for 25 years, told the pilgrimage audience. “Even though we don’t know all the names and we never will know all the names of the martyrs, you are remembering them, and we are remembering them. I salute you, and we salute you… This gives me real hope that we can come together and do what’s right for everyone in this country.”Berkeley Divinity at Yale Student Paul Daniels II sings a renewal of baptismal vows at the Tubman Museum in Macon, Georgia, during an Oct. 22 event to commemorate the life of lynching victim John “Cockey” Glover. Photo: Hala Hess WhiteThe pilgrimage continued at the nearby Tubman Museum, which focuses on African-American art, history and culture, where participants viewed historical photos of lynchings across the country, including Minnesota, Wyoming and Oklahoma. Facilitators worked with small groups to continue the dialogue before the pilgrimage ended.“This is so important at a time in which our nation is politically and racially polarized,” said Tubman Museum Director Andy Ambrose. “We need to do this.”For Christian clergy and lay leaders in Georgia and the South, reconciliation efforts such as the pilgrimage represent a significant historical shift.“One great irony is that as this region was simultaneously becoming the lynching center of the United States, it was also becoming the Bible Belt,” Manis told the pilgrimage participants. “So many of those ghastly affairs were presided over by Christian clergy…. The white Christians at the time were certain that the ritual [of lynching] was a sign of their purity.”Confronting evidence of lynchingMany of the museum’s lynching photos featured bystanders, with their expressions ranging from smiling to disinterest. Katie Capurso Ernst, program manager of the Mission Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, wondered if their response was any different from most Americans who view a police shooting video today.“I don’t know in the moment if people are aware when history is being made,” said Ernst, who is helping plan a similar commemoration in the Diocese of Massachusetts. “In a thousand years, would people look back at [current] videos of police shootings, how many views they got and things still hadn’t changed?”Others said connecting the lynching evidence in Macon to present racial violence represents a powerful call to social justice.“We are drawing a line between lynching and police shootings. It‘s an evolution of the same intention,” said Paul Daniels II, a student at Yale’s Berkeley Divinity School in New Haven, Connecticut, and part of the delegation from Massachusetts that is seeking ways to address racism in their area. “Just as theologians connect lynching to the crucifixion of Christ. He was impoverished, with brown skin and he didn’t do what he was supposed to do.”“This helps you think more about faith and how to use it to help others,” said James Smith, 13, of Forsyth, Georgia, who attends St. Francis Episcopal Church and came with his sister and parents. “I didn’t understand how bad it was and I need to see how it is now and how I can relate so we can fix it for the future.”In 2017 and 2018, the Beloved Community Commission for Dismantling Racism plans to offer similar pilgrimages to other sites in Georgia. For more information, contact Catherine Meeks, [email protected]— Michelle Hiskey is an Atlanta-based freelance writer and member of St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ catherine meeks says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Pamela Wight says: Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL By Michelle HiskeyPosted Oct 25, 2016 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis November 10, 2016 at 11:40 pm How wonderful to hear from you. It was a delight to have Chris with us. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (2) Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Racial Justice & Reconciliation October 31, 2016 at 7:38 pm Reading this article from the other side of the world in Australia moves me deeply that our son Chris who now lives in Oak View Ca.had the privilege of being part of such a meaningful expression of remembrance. I pray healing & justice come upon your land as the blood of these martyrs cry out saying, “No more, learn from the past, don’t let our blood be spilt in vain.” Thank you for sharing this experience so that those who weren’t there can be challenged & motivated also by it’s impact. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

L’Évêque Primat Michael Curry annonce la conclusion d’un Pacte pour…

first_imgL’Évêque Primat Michael Curry annonce la conclusion d’un Pacte pour le diocèse d’Haïti Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Le 24 avril 2017] Avec nos sincères remerciements à Dieu tout-puissant et une profonde gratitude pour les prières d’un si grand nombre de fidèles de toute l’Église, Michael B. Curry, l’Évêque Président et Primat de l’Église épiscopale, annonce un Pacte conclu entre l’Évêque d’Haïti, Mgr Jean Zaché Duracin, l’Évêque suffragant, Mgr Ogé Beauvoir, le Comité permanent et lui-même.Le Pacte « vise à traiter et à résoudre un grand nombre de questions conflictuelles qui ont pesé sur le Diocèse », met fin à la pause sur les collectes de fonds de l’Église épiscopale et ouvre de nouvelles possibilités pour un avenir uni alors que le Diocèse se prépare à élire son prochain évêque diocésain en 2018.Comme indiqué dans la lettre de l’Évêque Président aux parties (lettre partagée avec l’Église): « Le Pacte a entièrement réglé l’affaire du Titre III qui impliquait la relation entre Mgr Beauvoir et le Comité permanent du Diocèse. En outre, le Pacte, tout comme le Protocole d’accord [qui donne des directives aux partenariats de mission]… a entièrement réglé l’affaire du titre IV qui était en instance contre l’Évêque Duracin ».L’Évêque Président célébrera la Sainte Eucharistie avec le clergé et les fidèles à Port-au-Prince le 23 mai. La liturgie comprendra la signature officielle du Pacte qui est maintenant en vigueur, ayant été signé par toutes les parties.Dans sa lettre à Mgr Duracin, à Mgr Beauvoir et au Comité permanent, l’Évêque Président Curry a déclaré : « Ce Pacte vise à traiter et résoudre un grand nombre de questions conflictuelles qui ont pesé sur le Diocèse et ouvrir une voie à suivre saine et positive pour le Diocèse et la relation entre le Diocèse et l’ensemble de l’Église. Je suis reconnaissant à mes deux frères évêques ainsi qu’au Président et aux membres du Comité permanent pour leur volonté de parvenir à ce Pacte qui, je pense, sert la cause de notre Seigneur et Sauveur Jésus-Christ en Haïti dans la poursuite de la reconstruction et du renouveau suite au tremblement de terre et alors que le Diocèse d’Haïti se prépare à élire son nouvel Évêque diocésain ».Il a ajouté : « Je suis satisfait de ces mesures car elles reflètent un engagement de la part de toutes les parties en faveur d’un travail continu de guérison et de réconciliation. Ceci n’aurait pas été possible sans les prières constantes des fidèles épiscopaliens d’Haïti et de toute l’Église. Et je sais que nous continuerons tous à prier pour le peuple haïtien, le Diocèse d’Haïti et le ministère du Seigneur Jésus-Christ ressuscité en Haïti et dans tous les pays de l’Église épiscopale.Le Pacte en anglais et en français figure iciVoici la lettre intégrale de l’Évêque Président :Lundi de PâquesLe 17 avril 2017Mes frères et sœurs dans le Christ,En cette semaine sainte commémorant la résurrection de notre Seigneur Jésus Christ, c’est avec sincère reconnaissance que je suis en mesure de partager avec vous la bonne nouvelle suivante. L’Évêque d’Haïti, l’Évêque suffragant d’Haïti, le Comité permanent du Diocèse d’Haïti et moi-même, votre Évêque Primat, avons conclu ensemble un Pacte.Ce Pacte vise à traiter et résoudre un grand nombre de questions conflictuelles qui ont pesé sur le Diocèse et ouvrir une voie à suivre saine et positive pour le Diocèse et la relation entre le Diocèse et l’ensemble de l’Église. Je suis reconnaissant à mes deux frères évêques ainsi qu’au Président et aux membres du Comité permanent pour leur volonté de parvenir à ce Pacte qui, je pense, sert la cause de notre Seigneur et Sauveur Jésus-Christ en Haïti dans la poursuite de la reconstruction et du renouveau suite au tremblement de terre et alors que le Diocèse d’Haïti se prépare à élire son nouvel Évêque diocésain.Le Pacte a entièrement réglé l’affaire du Titre III qui impliquait la relation entre l’Évêque suffragant Beauvoir et le Comité permanent du Diocèse. En outre, le Pacte ainsi que le Protocole d’accord (tous deux ci-joints) convenus entre l’Évêque Duracin et moi-même l’année passée, et les conversations pastorales entre l’Évêque Duracin et moi-même, ont entièrement réglé l’affaire du Titre IV qui était en instance contre l’Évêque Duracin. Je suis satisfait de ces mesures car elles reflètent un engagement de la part de toutes les parties en faveur d’un travail continu de guérison et de réconciliation.Permettez-moi de vous dire comment nous sommes parvenus à ce point. Comme je l’ai annoncé le 1er décembre 2016, j’ai nommé un panel de trois personnes (le rév. Stephen T. Ruelle, Évêque du Maine, le rév. P. Roger Bowen et Paul B. Nix, Jr., conseiller juridique interne de DFMS à New York) pour étudier la situation (voir https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2016/12/01/presiding-bishop-releases-letter-about-the-diocese-of-haiti/). À la suite d’entretiens minutieux et d’écoute des deux évêques, du Comité permanent et d’un groupe du clergé identifié par l’Évêque Beauvoir comme ayant des préoccupations majeures, le panel a indiqué dans son rapport ce qui suit :Ils ont tout d’abord signalé que quasiment toutes les personnes impliquées étaient profondément blessées par les choses que d’autres avaient dites et leur douleur était réelle et profonde. Malgré tout, les relations au sein du clergé sont généralement considérées comme « fondamentalement saines » . Le clergé a connu de graves tensions mais il semble qu’il y ait une volonté, voire même un fort désir de la part de bon nombre de membres du clergé d’essayer de parvenir à un règlement entre eux. Les membres du clergé travaillent entre eux depuis longtemps et leur engagement envers le Diocèse était évident.  Il y avait un sens général que de bonnes relations au sein du clergé pouvaient être restaurées avec un travail courageux et prudent. Il y avait également un sens partagé qu’il y a une tâche beaucoup plus importante à accomplir dans le Diocèse à laquelle il n’était pas prêté attention du fait de l’énergie dépensée par les litiges en cours et il y avait un empressement à s’attaquer à cette tâche.Par opposition aux relations au sein du clergé, il est apparu aux yeux du grand nombre que la rupture de la relation entre les deux évêques était irrécupérable, pour le moins en ce moment crucial. Il y avait des preuves d’un profond manque de confiance entre les évêques, manifesté en partie par les nombreux rapports de leur échange ouvert d’insultes. L’état de leurs relations avait donné lieu à beaucoup de tristesse, de frustration et de colère, non pas seulement entre les évêques mais également entre les membres du clergé, certains d’entre eux ayant une allégeance vis-à-vis d’un évêque ou de l’autre, qui ressentent que cette lutte entre les évêques a jeté une ombre malsaine sur le fonctionnement du Diocèse.Enfin, chaque groupe du clergé a fait part de ses profondes inquiétudes concernant l’exercice du pouvoir de l’un ou l’autre des évêques que chaque groupe pense ne pas servir les meilleurs intérêts du diocèse. Il y avait certaines préoccupations que l’Évêque Beauvoir, avant de prendre son congé, avait exercé son rôle d’Évêque suffragant sans pleinement apprécier les limites des pouvoirs de sa charge si bien que ses actions sapaient le bon ordre de l’Église. D’un autre côté, il y avait des preuves que l’Évêque Duracin n’avait pas apporté son soutien à l’épiscopat suffragant de l’Évêque Beauvoir, sur le plan financier et autre. Il y avait également des inquiétudes concernant le fait que l’Évêque Duracin exerçait son pouvoir de transfert du clergé au sein du Diocèse d’une manière qui était largement perçue comme récompensant ou punissant de façon indue ceux qui avaient ses faveurs ou ceux qui ne les avaient pas. Il y avait également une crainte que le processus à venir de l’élection d’un successeur à l’Évêque Duracin allait manquer d’intégrité en excluant les voix du clergé qui n’étaient pas en tous points alignées avec l’Évêque Duracin.À la lumière de cette situation compliquée et navrante et avec toutes les meilleures espérances et prières en faveur d’une solution positive et tournée vers l’avenir pour la santé du Diocèse d’Haïti, j’ai proposé de conclure un Pacte entre l’Évêque Duracin, l’Évêque Beauvoir, le Comité permanent du Diocèse et moi-même. J’avais espoir que ce Pacte allait servir de base pour résoudre les procédures du Titre III et du Titre IV alors en instance et engager le Diocèse sur une voie saine pour l’élection épiscopale prochaine.Après de profondes conversations et négociations, nous sommes maintenant parvenus à un Pacte avec lequel toutes les parties sont à l’aise et qui a à présent été signé par tout un chacun. Le texte du Pacte figure ci-après, tout comme le texte du Protocole d’accord qui offre un modèle pour nos partenariats caractérisé par l’égalité dans la prise de décision et la relation, par la transparence financière, par la responsabilité et la mutualité dans la mission, que ce soit en Haïti ou ailleurs dans l’Église épiscopale et au-delà. Grâce au Pacte et au Protocole d’accord à présent convenus et en place, la pause que j’avais placée sur la collecte de fonds pour Haïti est levée.En dernier point, nous sommes convenus et avons signé le Pacte mais nous allons tous nous rassembler pour la signature liturgique officielle du Pacte dans le contexte de la Célébration de la Sainte Eucharistie le mardi 23 mai 2017 à 10h00 au Séminaire théologique épiscopal de Port-au-Prince en Haïti.Je suis véritablement reconnaissant envers l’Évêque Duracin et l’Évêque Beauvoir, le clergé et les leaders laïcs du Diocèse d’Haïti et envers vous tous dans l’Église épiscopale qui avez prié et œuvré pour ce moment.Que les bénédictions de notre Seigneur Jésus crucifié et ressuscité soient avec nous tous alors que nous avançons ensemble pour proclamer la Bonne Nouvelle dans le nouvel avenir de Dieu.Votre frère,+Michael In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Haiti, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Apr 24, 2017 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Lambeth Palace gathering aims to strengthen religious liberty in British…

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Lambeth Palace gathering aims to strengthen religious liberty in British Commonwealth The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Posted Mar 23, 2018 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Anglican Communion News Service] Parliamentarians and religious leaders from around the British Commonwealth will gather at Lambeth Palace next month to discuss ways to strengthen religious liberty. Details of the event were given by Bishop of Rochester James Langstaff during a debate in the House of Lords on March 22. In the debate, one member of the House of Lords highlighted the fact that while 95 percent of people in the Commonwealth profess a religious belief, around 70 percent of the population live with high or very high government restrictions on the right to freedom of religion and belief.Read the full article here. Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Communion Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury will visit site of Indian massacre

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and his wife, Caroline, are featured on the home page of the 2020 Lambeth Conference. Photo: 2020 Lambeth Conference[Anglican Communion News Service] Pilgrimage, prayer and pastoral concern will form the key elements of the archbishop of Canterbury’s visit to the United Churches of North and South India this September.Archbishop Justin Welby will be joined by his wife for the 10-day visit, which will include taking part in 100th anniversary commemorations of the massacre in Amritsar.Read the full article here. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Asia TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Rachel FarmerPosted Aug 2, 2019 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector Bath, NC Archbishop of Canterbury will visit site of Indian massacre Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Anglican Communion, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

Anglicans, Episcopalians lament UNCSW’s postponement, recommit to gender justice work

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Rt. Rev. Mary Glasspool preached March 9 at the Episcopal Church Center’s Chapel of Christ the Lord. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Plans change, and it’s OK to mourn or grieve a future that’s not to happen, said the Rt. Rev. Mary Glasspool, assistant bishop in the Episcopal Diocese of New York.“But now you notice, I said, ‘a future,’ not ‘the future,’” Glasspool said to a dozen or so women and men gathered March 9 for Eucharist at the Episcopal Church Center’s Chapel of Christ the Lord on Second Avenue in New York, one block west of United Nations headquarters.“The future is always in God’s hands. And even if it’s something over which we have no control, our prayer in gratitude to the God who loves us … is that it’s God’s future,” Glasspool said. “God may, in fact, bestow on us gifts that we didn’t look for. … Our call is to be open to those gifts.”A special Eucharist marking the opening of the 64th United Nations Commission on the Status of Women had previously been planned; however, in the wake of last week’s announcement postponing the annual conference due to public health concerns associated with the coronavirus, the Church Center held its regular noonday Eucharist in deference to the UNCSW, with Anglican and Episcopal women writing the Prayers of the People.“Be with us as we await our time together with the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women,” Glasspool said. “Uphold us in our faith, and protect us and all those who currently live in fear of the illness in the world. Teach us to share your word and your ways in our actions and in our writing.”The UNCSW draws thousands of people to the annual meeting in New York; the main meeting has been postponed until the coronavirus no longer presents a risk to public health. The commission did, however, convene on the morning of March 9 for a procedural meeting with delegations and civil society representatives based in New York.At that meeting, member states adopted a political declaration commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing in 1995, and leaders pledged to ramp up efforts to fully implement the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, considered a “visionary” blueprint for advancing women’s rights.It was a disappointment last week when the full meeting was postponed and it was announced that the Anglican and Episcopal delegations due to travel to New York for the annual meeting were canceled.“In the meantime, our presiding bishop’s Episcopal delegates and the Anglican Communion delegates continue their work,” said Lynnaia Main, The Episcopal Church’s representative to the United Nations. “It’s an opportunity for us as a church to use this time to continue to educate ourselves about what Beijing is and why it’s so important for women and girls.”This spring, Episcopal delegates will participate in an online meeting exploring how The Episcopal Church has engaged in the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, and each delegate will be assigned to blog about one of the critical areas of concern addressed in the blueprint.– Lynette Wilson is managing editor of Episcopal News Service. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Health & Healthcare, Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ COVID-19, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, UNCSW, Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC By Lynette Wilson Posted Mar 9, 2020 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL UNCSW 2020 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Anglicans, Episcopalians lament UNCSW’s postponement, recommit to gender justice work Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more