Parents rank ND as No. 4

first_imgParents listed Notre Dame as the No. 4 “dream school” for their children in the Princeton Review’s annual “College Hopes and Worries” survey, marking the second consecutive year the University has held that place. The Princeton Review website states “dream colleges” are schools parents wish their child could attend if cost and admission were not contributing factors, and the 2013 list ranks Notre Dame behind Stanford University, Harvard University and Princeton University. Students ranked their own top-10 dream colleges in a different list, and Notre Dame was not included in that set. University spokesman Dennis Brown said the admissions department takes such rankings “with a grain of salt” due to differences in methodology, but this one reflects Notre Dame’s unique appeal to parents. “I think that [the ranking] reflects the basic tenets of the University: a commitment to undergraduate education, a sense of community and an ongoing commitment to faith and religious identity,” Brown said. “The combination of things that Notre Dame offers … is unusual in a lot of different ways, and some parents take comfort in that.” Notre Dame is the only religiously-affiliated school on either list, and Brown said the University’s dual emphasis on faith and academics is ideal for many interested families. “For people whose faith is important to them, the fact that you can come to a place like Notre Dame and practice your faith, … yet still at the same time get a world-class education, is crucial,” Brown said. “You can be a part of a broader University community that will pay dividends throughout your life in terms of the alumni network and the bonds created in the residence halls.” Robert Mundy, director of admissions, said it is “hard to predict” whether the ranking will affect Notre Dame’s future applicant pools, but trends in the past decade have shown parents are becoming more involved in their children’s college selection processes. “Students are ultimately making the decisions, but the influence of the parents has increased,” Mundy said. “Whether it’s generational or financial or due to another factor, parents are getting more actively involved in where [their children] apply and actually attend.” Mundy said comparing the parents’ impressions of a university to those of their children can be an interesting and informative way to interpret such a ranking. “Your parents’ impressions or expectations about your college experience are a little different than your own impressions, and I saw that clearly as I looked through the rest of the Princeton Review survey results,” he said. “It’s all about looking for different things, which depends on which role you’re speaking from. … There’s no disputing that parents have a different view [than students].” Notre Dame’s policies on aspects such as dorm life and parietals are seen differently by parents and students, Mundy said, and this may have contributed to the discrepancies on the two Princeton Review lists. “I really do believe that the nature of the Notre Dame family strikes a chord with the parents, and that’s clearly tied to our mission,” Mundy said. “Things like that appeal to parents in a different way than they appeal to students.” While he said there is no way to determine what the ranking will mean for Notre Dame’s popular perception and future applicant pools, the parents’ increased influence on their students’ college decisions make this “good news all around.” “Obviously, the students are the ones who sit down for dinner every night with their parents, and if they have a positive impression [of Notre Dame] in their minds, that can affect them either apparently or subliminally,” Mundy said. Brown said such rankings serve as “good starting points” for prospective parents and their students but are not weighted heavily in the admissions office. “College surveys are of some use, but people who are serious about their college choice are going to dig in deeper,” he said. “While we’d rather be ranked than not, at the same time we recognize that they’re … just a starting point.”last_img read more

Brazil’s Bolsonaro tests positive for coronavirus again

first_imgTopics : He is due to take a new test “in the coming days.”Since his diagnosis on July 7, Bolsonaro has been confined to the presidential palace alongside other people that have already contracted the virus.It’s a far cry from his regular daily routine that includes leaving the residence to greet his supporters, often while ignoring social distancing measures and without wearing a face mask.As well as taking part in video calls, Bolsonaro has been seen feeding rheas — a bird species native to South America that is related to the ostrich and emu — in the gardens of the official residence. One even pecked him.Brazil is the second worst affected country in the world by the coronavirus after the United States, with more than 74,000 dead and 1.9 million cases. He admitted on Monday by telephone interview with CNN that he “can’t stand this routine of staying at home” and said he was waiting “anxiously” to be given the all-clear to leave the house.He told the television channel he hasn’t had any symptoms such as a fever or respiratory difficulties since July 6.And he added that he continues to take the anti-malarial medication hydroxychloroquine.The drug has been pushed as a treatment for COVID-19 in many countries — but its effectiveness has not been formally proven and the issue is deeply dividing the global scientific community.center_img Brazil President Jair Bolsonaro tested positive for coronavirus again, CNN Brazil said on Wednesday, quoting the far right leader, who underwent a new test on Tuesday.Bolsonaro, who at 65 is in a high risk group, said he would remain in quarantine at his official residence in Brasilia from where he would continue to work by video conference.The far-right president, who has caused huge controversy in Brazil for repeatedly flouting lockdown measures in place to curb the spread of the virus, first tested positive a week ago.last_img read more

Investigation launched after worker suffers injuries on rig off Canada

first_imgAn investigation has been launched after an offshore worker has suffered injuries on a Transocean-owned drilling rig operating for Suncor Energy offshore Canada. Canadian regulator, the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB), reported on Monday it had initiated a formal investigation into an incident reported by Suncor Energy on September 6, 2019.Earlier that same day, a Transocean employee on the Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU) Transocean Barents was injured while preparing the rig for forecasted weather. The worker was caught between a steel adapter weighing 1400kg and a rail during crane operations.An “all stop” was immediately called and the medic and emergency response team were called to the scene. The injured worker was transferred by medevac to St. John’s on Friday afternoon. The worker is currently in stable condition and remains in hospital under observation. The incident had the potential for fatality, according to the regulator.The regulator said that operations were suspended on the Transocean Barents following the incident and the area secured. Drilling operations remain suspended and will not resume until Suncor has received approval from the C-NLOPB to do so.This is not the first time for Suncor and Transocean Barents to be put under investigation. Namely, the Canadian regulator in May 2018 started an investigation following a synthetic-based mud spill from the Transocean Barents rig.Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

EC AquaTrojan John Crawley Advances To Diving State Finals

first_imgCongratulations to East Central AquaTrojan John Crawley on advancing To Diving State Finals with an eighth-place finish at The Diving Regionals at Bloomington South.AquaTrojan Swimmer Nick Weber will also be participating at The Swimming State Finals in the 50 Free.Nick will also be in the 200 Medley Relay team of Nick Weber, Jackson Ketcham, Matt Baddinghaus, and Owen Matthew at The State Finals. Ketcham, in addition, will be swimming in the 200 Free and the 500 Free.The Boys Swimming State Finals at The IUPUI  Natatorium on Friday and Saturday, February 28th and 29th.last_img read more