10 months agoDalian Yifang attacker Carrasco in contact with Arsenal

first_imgDalian Yifang attacker Carrasco in contact with Arsenalby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBelgium winger Yannick Carrasco has emerged as a target for Arsenal.Sky Italia says the 25-year-old left Atletico Madrid to join Chinese Super League side Dalian Yifang in February last year.Arsenal have made initial contact with the Belgian international, who has given his ‘approval’ to the move.Carrasco is said to be open to moving to the Premier League with the Gunners now favourites for his signature.Milan had been keen on Carrasco and the player even liked a social media post about a potential move to the San Siro.But there are doubts over whether Milan would be able to afford the deal, with Carrasco currently pocketing around £170,000-a-week in China. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Video: Duke Basketball Releases Cool Video Celebrating All Of Coach K’s NBA Draft Picks

first_imgGrant Hill of Duke on draft day.Grant Hill DukeKentucky is the college basketball program that gets most of the love these days for producing NBA talent, but Duke has been pretty great at it, too. Since Mike Krzyzewski took over the Blue Devils’ program in 1980, he’s had 51 players get selected in the NBA Draft. Thursday night, he’ll add to that number, as Jahlil Okafor, Justise Winslow and Tyus Jones are all projected to get picked in the first round, with Quinn Cook a potential second-round pick. In anticipation of the draft, Duke has released a cool video celebrating all of Coach K’s NBA players.last_img read more

Zika Threat Prompts Edie Falco to Call for Shutdown of Monkey Facilities

first_imgIt’s not an episode of Nurse Jackie, but it could be a health emergency. Emmy Award–winning actor Edie Falco is joining PETA in calling on Florida Interim Surgeon General Celeste Philip to take an important step to prevent the spread of the Zika virus: Shut down the massive monkey-breeding facilities in Hendry County.“Your office recently declared Zika as a public health emergency in Florida, recommending residents drain standing water and wear insect repellent as a way to curb the virus’s spread,” wrote Edie in a letter to Philip. “As you know, monkeys, like humans, are a natural host for the Zika virus.“That is why I was shocked to learn from my friends at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) that Hendry County, Florida has quietly become host to several primate dealers that import, warehouse, and sell monkeys for experimentation. At these facilities, thousands of monkeys are kept in crowded open-air cages surrounded by ditches and swamps.“An eyewitness investigation by PETA at the notorious Primate Products Inc. not only documented workers violently handling terrified monkeys, but also showed improper drainage and standing water. Zika cases in humans have already been identified in several neighboring counties, and it’s just a matter of time until the virus hits the jackpot — thousands of stressed, caged monkeys who cannot escape hungry mosquitoes.“I have found Florida to be rich in wildlife and natural beauty. It is a shame to know that these feeling, intelligent monkeys are being warehoused and abused there, and worse yet, these monkey prisons are the perfect breeding ground for the Zika virus to hide out and multiply undetected.“Dr. Philip, I hope that the Florida Surgeon General’s office finds that confining stressed monkeys in crowded, decrepit conditions in the midst of a Zika outbreak poses a threat to human health. Please protect the public and the animals by working to close these monkey warehouses down for good.”Monkeys, like humans, are natural hosts for the Zika virus—and may not show any symptoms when infected. Thousands of monkeys are now housed by several primate dealers in Hendry County, including Primate Products, Inc. (PPI). Video shot inside PPI by PETA, whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to experiment on,” reveals improper drainage and standing water — conditions ripe for mosquito breeding.last_img read more

Michigan State of the State 2016 Rep Ken Yonker RCaledonia

first_img20Jan Michigan State of the State 2016: Rep. Ken Yonker, R-Caledonia Categories: Featured news,Infographics,News Tags: #SB, MISOTS16, Yonker last_img

Satellite operator SES reported its contract backl

first_imgSatellite operator SES reported its contract backlog had reached an all-time high of €7.2 billion at the end of the third quarter, up from €6.8 billion at the end of June.During the quarter, SES signed a 24-transponder contract renewal with Canal Plus and a six-transponder renewal with the BBC, and brought two new satellites – SES-4 and SES-5 – into service. In Europe, the Astra 2F satellite has been successfully launched and will be brought into service later this month.SES reported revenue of €1.36 billion for the first nine months of the year, up 1.6% at constant exchange rates, with year-to-date EBITDA of €1.01 billion, up 1.8% at constant exchange rates.SES president and CEO Romain Bausch said results for the first nine months were in line with expectations, and that revenue growth had been achieved despite digital switchover in Germany. SES confirmed its full-year guidance for 2012 and revenue and EBITDA CAGR guidance for 2012-14.last_img read more

Finnish operator DNA has tapped Harmonic to provid

first_imgFinnish operator DNA has tapped Harmonic to provide it with a complete OTT solution for its DNA TV multiscreen service.Harmonic said its multiscreen processing and delivery solutions allow DNA to deliver live TV channels and VOD content to more than 200,000 subscribers on a wide range of devices.“Harmonic’s multiscreen processing and delivery solutions enable DNA to deliver live TV channels and VOD content to more than 200,000 subscribers on a wide range of devices, with pristine video quality, at a low total cost of ownership,” said DNA’s head of broadband and entertainment services, Pekka Jääskeläinen.last_img read more

While traditional broadcasters in the US have hist

first_imgWhile traditional broadcasters in the US have historically been confronted with more, and more rigorous, regulation than emerging internet and new media giants, the solution should lie more on the side of reducing regulation on traditional player rather than imposing new regulations on the likes of Facebook and Google, according to Congressman Greg Walden of Oregon, head of the House Energy and Commerce Committee with oversight over broadcasting relocation costs.Greg WaldenSpeaking at the NAB Show in Las Vegas ahead of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerburg’s appearance before his committee this week, Walden said that his preference would be for a lifting of some of the regulatory burden currently placed on broadcasters rather than new regulation on big tech that could stifle innovation.Walden said the current scandal around Facebook’s protection of consumer data or lack thereof was a “serious matter”, but added that the powers already exercised by the Federal Trade Commission could help address some of the concerns raised.Walden said Zuckerburg was “an incredible innovator” but did concede that Silicon Valley companies had “never been regulated”. However, he said, to level the playing field with broadcasters it would be preferable to clean up and remove regulations that are now out of date or unnecessary, rather than to introduce a much heavier regulatory regime for big tech companies.“I am more on the light touch regulation side – to clean out the underbrush of legacy regulation,” he said.Walden, who had a background in local broadcasting before entering politics, said that it is important for broadcasters “not to presume” that legislators had a clear understanding of the broadcast business or new media platforms.He said that, currently, Facebook and other internet companies do not face the same public service duties as those imposed on broadcasters, and added that it was important for tech companies to take responsibility to ensure that properly sourced news journalism is prominent.Walden said that “what is lacking on the internet is any editor” to ensure that news if fact-checked, and added that this could have an impact on the health of democracy.last_img read more

Researchers discover key factors behind intestinal inflammation in CVID patients

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 14 2018Oregon State University researchers have discovered two key factors behind the intestinal inflammation that plagues people suffering from a disorder that affects their immune system.The findings, published in Clinical Immunology, are important because common variable immunodeficiency, known as CVID, afflicts hundreds of thousands of people worldwide.A significant proportion of them will have potentially life-threatening intestinal problems that include improper absorption of nutrients, particularly fat.CVID patients aren’t able to produce enough antibodies, Y-shaped proteins that mark invaders such as viruses and bacteria for destruction by the immune system. That means those people are highly susceptible to infection that often leads to chronic conditions, especially in their lungs, ears and sinuses.Related StoriesResearchers one step closer to unmasking the cause of familial MSFibrinogen a key player in health and disease, says new studyHow an orchestra of neurons control hunger pangsIn roughly 90 percent of the cases, CVID’s cause is an undetermined mix of genetic triggers; the other 10 percent have a known genetic cause.Overall, about 15 percent of CVID sufferers will end up with intestinal inflammation that will show up as weight loss associated with severe diarrhea.Researchers led by Andrey Morgun of the OSU/OHSU College of Pharmacy and Natalia Shulzhenko of Oregon State’s Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine used a novel computational approach called transkingdom network analysis to determine that a particular bacterium, Acinetobacter baumannii, is one of the main microbes responsible for CVID enteropathy.”That bacterium had not been previously found to cause intestinal illness,” said Morgun, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences.The study, which involved 15 patients and several control subjects, also showed that CVID patients with enteropathy have dramatically lower levels of immunoglobulin A – the main antibody of the mucous membranes – in the tissue of their duodenum than do CVID patients who don’t have enteropathy. The duodenum is the first part of the small intestine, just beyond the stomach.”This finding strongly suggests that CVID patients with enteropathy exhibit more mucosal immunodeficiency than those without and are therefore more at risk for a form of gut infection that could cause intestinal inflammation,” Morgun said.Source: https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/researchers-identify-factors-behind-small-intestine-inflammation-immunodeficiency-patientslast_img read more

New cause of serious aortic disease discovered

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 4 2019Researchers have discovered that a family of lipids (fats) contribute to the development of a serious aortic disease, by driving clotting in the blood vessel wall.The findings could lead to the development of new treatments for this potentially life threatening condition.The team, led by researchers at Cardiff University, in collaboration with colleagues at Oxford and Erlangen, discovered that the lipids, called eoxPL, promote the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) – a disease of the aorta where inflammation causes damage and can ultimately lead to rupture.When AAA ruptures, uncontrolled internal bleeding can lead to death within minutes; only about 2 in 10 people survive. Many aneurysms are not detected until they rupture, and for those that are, treatments to stop them progressing are limited. Men aged 65 and over are most at risk of developing AAAs.Related StoriesScientists turn type A blood into universal type O, potentially doubling blood transfusion stocksSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchProfessor Valerie O’Donnell, Co-Director of Systems Immunity Research Institute at Cardiff University, who led the research, said: “After discovering new lipids that promote blood clotting we wondered if they also played a part in AAA, as we know the condition is linked to blood clotting.”Our research found that these lipids in circulating blood cells did promote AAA formation in the vessel wall, because they directly regulate blood clotting.”Unexpectedly, when administered into the blood system, the same lipids were also found to have preventative properties because rather than being made by circulating blood cells in the vessel wall they instead mop up clotting factors, causing them to be removed from circulation and preventing disease.”Professor Jeremy Pearson, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, which funded the research, added: “An AAA is not usually found before a life-threatening rupture occurs, and there is no routine treatment to prevent them. However, screening is offered to men from 65 years of age, which involves a simple 10-15 minute ultrasound scan.”This research gives us a new understanding of the biological links between blood clotting and the development of an AAA. The findings also suggest that to stop blood clotting from happening, whether directly or by blocking the formation of these lipids, could be an effective way to reduce the risk of rupture in people where screening reveals an AAA.”The study ‘Phospholipid membranes drive abdominal aortic aneurysm development through stimulating coagulation factor activity’ is published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and a review article on the new lipids was also published this month in Science Signaling. Source:https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/news/view/1472495-researchers-uncover-new-cause-of-abdominal-aortic-aneurysmlast_img read more

Survey reports large discrepancy in patients knowledge of cardiac implantable electronic devices

first_imgMay 9 2019Results from a new survey are the first to report a large discrepancy in patient’s knowledge of their cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED). The study reviewed patients’ overall knowledge of data from their devices as well as their perceptions on what is most important. Participants in this study have a strong desire to better understand their device and its data, with more guidance on battery life as the most important aspect for patients. The study is scheduled to be presented on Wednesday, May 8 at Heart Rhythm 2019, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 40th Annual Scientific Sessions.In the United States, cardiac arrhythmias impact an estimated 14.4 million patients (AHA). Today, CIEDs have evolved to be a prevalent treatment option for these patients, with more than 300,000 individuals receiving new CIED implants every year in the U.S. alone (Journal of American College of Cardiology). As new technology innovations emerge, patients have greater or unprecedented access to real-time data and information about their health from their devices. With advancing technology and increasing use of CIEDs, there is a need to better understand patients’ knowledge of their devices and their perceptions of what data elements are most important.The study initially screened 400 patients between July and December 2018 who attended an in-person device evaluation at the Cleveland Clinic outpatient clinic. The mean patient age was 62.9±12.8 years and 64 percent were male. Patients received a one-page questionnaire asking multiple choice questions in seven basic categories: type of CIED, original indication, functionality, manufacturer, number of active leads, estimated battery life, and number of shocks. Their answers were then compared to their interrogation report to assess accuracy. Patients were also asked to share what data would be most important to them as the device user. The importance of collaboration between clinicians, patients, industry and medical societies and how to manage access to data will be discussed during the inaugural Digital Summit on Wednesday, May 8.The Heart Rhythm Society’s 40th Annual Scientific Sessions convenes the finest clinicians, scientists, researchers, and innovators in the field of cardiac pacing and electrophysiology. More than 700 of the world’s most notable experts in cardiac rhythm management serve as faculty for over 250 educational sessions while more than 150 exhibitors showcase innovative products and services. Attendees can anticipate an enhanced experience with advanced learning formats and new opportunities for networking. Related StoriesCutting around 300 calories a day protects the heart even in svelte adultsSmoking triples the risk of death from cardiovascular diseaseTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockIn this cohort, 344 or 86 percent of patients agreed to take the survey. From this group, 62 percent agreed or strongly agreed that they were knowledgeable about their device, however, 84 percent missed at least one question. 48 percent of survey participants missed at least two questions about their device. Patients agreed or strongly agreed that they had a desire to have more information regarding each of the following: battery life (81 percent), activity level (76 percent), heart rate trend (73 percent) and ventricular arrhythmias (71 percent). The results of this study show a discrepancy in patients’ knowledge regarding their CIEDs and their wish to better understand the device. Our research uncovered a discrepancy between patients’ perception of their own knowledge of their devices and their actual knowledge about their device. While some patients have lived with these devices for years, our results show that there is still a general lack of knowledge. As digital health evolves, patients are able to access their own health data in real-time. By equipping device users to be active participants in their health, we hope they will be able to utilize their own data and be empowered to be more engaged in their care and live a healthier life.”Lead Author Divyang Patel, MD, Cleveland Cliniccenter_img Despite the advancement in remote monitoring of CIEDs, up until recently it has been a process between clinicians and manufacturers, with patients on the receiving end. Now that patients have access to data in real-time, especially with the advancement of digital health technologies and increased use of smart devices, we need to help guide patients, clinicians, and manufacturers on how to make the most out of their information to help advance patient care and lead to positive outcomes. Our study is one of the first to give insight into the voice of the patient and what they desire to know. Now, the physician community along with device manufacturers and medical societies need to work together on a plan for optimal education and success.”Senior Author Khaldoun Tarakji, MD, MPH, FHRS, Cleveland Clinic Source:https://www.hrsonline.org/last_img read more

Japans new Airbnb law a doubleedged sword

first_img Explore further © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Rental platforms like Airbnb are hoping for a boost from a new law coming into force next month in Japan ahead of an expected surge in demand for the 2020 Olympics, but experts warn it could actually hamper business in the short-term. Currently anyone renting out a room risks falling foul of the law but short-term rentals will be legalised on June 15, clearing up a legal grey area.But the new law also introduces fresh restrictions, dismaying many who rent out rooms to tourists via Airbnb or similar platforms.Would-be renters will have to register their lodgings with the authorities and the new law limits total overnight stays to 180 days per year.The new legislation allows local authorities to impose their own restrictions too.The tourist-magnet of Kyoto, for example, has said it will only permit rentals in residential areas between mid-January and mid-March, the low season for tourist arrivals.Jake Wilczynski, Airbnb spokesman for Asia-Pacific, told AFP the new laws are a “clear sign that Japan is buying in to the idea of short-term rentals for individuals”.But many have cancelled reservations or simply taken their lodgings off the platform.”Under the new law, Airbnb hosts will not be able to accommodate guests as easily as before. I hope this doesn’t put the bar too high for us,” 41-year-old Nobuhide Kaneda, who rents out a room in Tokyo, told AFP.On an Airbnb discussion forum, an Australian host identifying herself as Narelle wrote: “I am… becoming frustrated that no one knows what is required.””I also feel the three-month timeframe to organise a notification number is unrealistic.”‘Waiting for instructions’Airbnb does not say how many properties on its platform already comply with the new laws but does not deny there have been some teething problems.Wilczynski said the firm was “in the process of discussing the issue with the Japanese Tourism Agency”.”We are waiting for instructions,” said the spokesman for Airbnb, which has informed its members of the legal changes.Despite the new restrictions, there is a huge potential market for short-term rentals as the country gears up for Tokyo 2020 and the Rugby World Cup the previous year. There will likely be strong demand for short term rentals during the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo In Denmark, Airbnb to report hosts’ rent to tax authorities Airbnb rentals have boomed in recent years, driven by an increase in tourism and a surprising lack of hotel infrastructure. With around 60,000 listings, Airbnb dominates the Japanese vacation rental market, even though it lags far behind many countries in Europe—France, for example, has 450,000 listings.And demand is poised to rise as Japan targets an influx of 40 million visitors in 2020 when it hosts the Summer Olympics—up from 29 million last year.Yasuhiro Kamiyama, CEO of Hyakusenrenma, a local firm that manages 2,000 private rentals, said the new law will begin to “normalise Japan’s Airbnb market”.He hopes to have 30,000 rental properties on his books by 2020.Mizuho, a research institute, said that “vacation rental services are unlikely to rapidly expand after (the law’s) introduction. But the potential needs are great among foreign tourists, particularly from Asia.”However, the loosening of the law will also open the door to fierce competition.E-commerce giant Rakuten is planning to launch a property rental site as soon as it comes into effect and telecom group KDDI has also set up a reservation platform.Hotel chains will also be stepping up their game, building new sites to counter “the risk of a shortage” come 2020, according to a recent research note from Mizuho. ‘Noisy neighbours’An additional problem faced by potential hosts is opposition from neighbours, who worry about noise from holidaymakers or security.According to Japanese media, there have been several cases of management companies or co-owners banning sub-lets in their buildings.Soichi Taguchi, a Japanese tourism official, said the new laws were “urgently needed to ensure public health and prevent trouble with local residents”.But Airbnb called such incidents “extremely rare”, and Hyakusenrenma’s CEO said “all the problems have stemmed from illegal rentals because neighbours did not know who was operating them”.In a bid to overcome such local difficulties, some platforms offer extra services to manage rentals, such as providing the welcome to guests, handing over keys and showing them around the property.Airbnb has forged a partnership with a service provider which registers properties with local authorities, and arranges wireless internet and cleaning after the rental. Citation: Japan’s new ‘Airbnb law’: a double-edged sword (2018, May 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-japan-airbnb-law-double-edged-sword.html Nobuhide Kaneda (left) rents his apartment to Max Ikeda (back right), a Ukrainian-Japanese living in Hiroshimalast_img read more

Amid blackout scare stories remember that a grid without power cuts is

first_imgAs part of this exercise, AEMO forecasts the expected unserved energy in each region over the coming decade. Importantly, the base forecast only assumes “existing and committed projects.” Committed projects are essentially new generation assets that are fully financed. It also doesn’t include the temporary diesel generators installed in SA last summer, or the efforts to procure emergency reserves through the “Reliability and Emergency Reserve Trader”. These measures further reduce the likelihood of involuntary load shedding. Simply put, the statement forecasts the expected unserved energy over the next decade, if there is no further investment and the market operator fails to procure emergency reserves. Granted, this year’s report does shows an increased risk of unserved energy, compared with last year. In Victoria, this is primarily due to an increase in the forced outage rate assumptions for ageing brown coal plants.But the report also notes that AEMO expects the reliability standard to be maintained in NSW, Victoria and SA every year for the next decade, in the neutral scenario of its “Integrated System Plan” (ISP).The level of unserved energy in Victoria is forecast to fall to within the reliability standard. AEMO says this is due to the substantial volume of additional new intermittent generation developed in Victoria to meet the state’s renewable energy target, and additional interconnection called for within the ISP scenarios.What about blackouts?The media and politicians have seized on the “one-in-three chance of a blackout.” And it’s true: AEMO did indeed report a one-in-three chance of unserved energy in Victoria this summer. Citation: Amid blackout scare stories, remember that a grid without power cuts is impossible… and expensive (2018, August 27) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-blackout-stories-grid-power-impossible.html Forecast USE outcomes – ISP Neutral development plans. AEMO 2018, Electricity Statement of Opportunities Forecast USE outcomes – neutral demand, only existing and committed projects. AEMO 2018, Electricity Statement of Opportunities Sources of supply interruptions in the NEM: 2007-08 to 2015-16. AEMC 2017, Reliability Frameworks Review, Interim Report (page 54) Last Friday the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) released its annual Electricity Statement of Opportunities. This was widely (and inaccurately) reported as predicting widespread blackouts. Explore further Unserved energy in the NEM: 2007-08 to 2016-17. AEMC 2018, 2017 Annual Market Performance Review (xvii) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Let’s have a look at what the reliability requirements actually are, and what AEMO’s Electricity Statement of Opportunities does and doesn’t say about the situation.Leaving aside the majority of blackouts due to faults or incidents, there are also some relatively rare times when there is simply not enough generation or transmission capacity to meet demand. This leads to “involuntary load shedding,” which is where certain customers’ energy demands go unmet – which they would experience as a blackout. This unmet energy demand is referred to as “unserved energy.”In the National Electricity Market, we have a reliability standard which specifies that expected unserved energy should not exceed 0.002% of total energy consumption in any region in any financial year. In other words, the system is expected to deliver at least 99.998% of the energy demanded by consumers. Historically, our grid has generally passed this standard with flying colours. Anyone who’s ever suffered the frustration of a power cut might ask why the reliability standard isn’t 100.000%. But building an infallible system – to the extent that it is even possible – would be hugely expensive. To do it, we would need enough capacity to supply every conceivable power demand scenario, no matter how outlandish. What does AEMO’s statement say?The annual Electricity Statement of Opportunities is intended to inform the market about when and where new generation is expected to be needed. This allows project developers to sharpen their pencils, develop and commit to new power projects. As the title of the report suggestions, it reveals opportunities for new investment. Provided by The Conversation Musk’s record-breaking battery officially launches in Australia But this figure is misleading when taken out of context. While there is a fair chance that some energy demand will go unserved, AEMO’s report also predicts that it will be below 0.002%, thus meeting the reliability standard.There is actually always a chance of some unserved energy. As discussed above, the aim isn’t to have no power cuts at all, but to keep them to an economically acceptable level. The fevered commentary misses this crucial nuance. But if it sells a few more newspapers, what’s the harm, right?Well, here’s the harm. Beating up the likelihood and significance of blackouts has real cost implications, as we have seen over the past decade through the gold-plating of “poles and wires.” Last month the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission released a report that specifically said “large cost increases in NSW and Queensland were due to the imposition of high network reliability standards on distributors in those states.” These high reliability standards were imposed after a series of minor blackouts in 2004-05.The Productivity Commission also addressed this issue in its 2013 review of network regulation, which blamed rising power bills on “political responses to isolated major blackouts, rather than systemic problems.” At a time when electricity prices are front-page news, unfounded hysteria about the risk of blackouts risks subjecting customers to yet more gold-plating. The community deserves to know the actual costs of improving our already highly reliable electricity system, rather than being fed fearful stories about the lights going out. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The Sydney Morning Herald reported “a one in three chance of power failure in Victoria unless immediate action is taken,” a prospect described by Victoria’s opposition energy spokesman David Southwick as “completely unacceptable”. In Adelaide, The Advertiser reported that South Australia faces a one-in-ten chance of forced blackouts this summer.Unfortunately, the commentary around AEMO’s annual statement has become increasingly misleading and irresponsible over time. The media reporting and public comments are tacitly or even explicitly advocating for the generation system to be “gold-plated,” which would come at great expense to consumers. Reliability and “unserved energy”Reliability, as defined in the National Electricity Market, is a measure of the ability of the grid and its associated electricity generation infrastructure to meet consumers’ demand.But the vast majority of power outages experienced by customers do not fall under this definition. Some 97% of blackouts are caused by faults or other incidents on the network, rather than a failure to install enough capacity to meet reliability standards. The blackouts that hit customers in New South Wales and Victoria over the weekend were perhaps inevitably described in parts of the media as a “dramatic reminder” to new Prime Minister Scott Morrison of the importance of addressing energy policy. But of course it is hard to legislate against lightning, which in this case triggered two interstate interconnector cables to trip and cause blackouts.last_img read more