Another loss another lesson for Lions

first_imgIt was the second loss of their 10-match tour of New Zealand after they were also overhauled by the Auckland Blues in their 22-16 loss at Eden Park last Wednesday.Last night’s defeat at Otago Regional Stadium, however, was a bigger blow for the tourists, who had had impressed with a 12-3 win over the Canterbury Crusaders last Saturday and looked to have begun to get some momentum into their tour.”The guys are disappointed,” Gatland told reporters in Dunedin. “We shot ourselves in the foot with some turnovers and penalties in the last 10 minutes.”There are some key moments to learn from, the big lesson is that New Zealand sides play for 80 minutes.”Marty Banks won the game for the home side when he slotted a 74th minute penalty, though two powerful scrums from their replacement front rowers had given them the field position for the flyhalf to seal the opportunity.The Lions had earlier failed to put the game away with the ultra-consistent Owen Farrell missing a penalty that would have given them a 25-20 lead with 12 minutes remaining.Gatland said his side should have taken control of the match before then anyway.”At 22-13 we have got ourselves in front and the boys said they were reasonably comfortable and unfortunately some big moments that we didn’t nail allowed them back into the game,” Gatland added.”We just needed strong game management to close the game down, then we missed a penalty that Owen would normally kick every day and Marty Banks made his.”Those are the fine margins.”Lions captain Sam Warburton said he was disappointed his side had given away too many penalties, with referee Angus Gardner warning the Welshman that they could face a yellow card if they continued to transgress.The loss had also upset their momentum as they head into the clash with the Maori All Blacks in Rotorua on Saturday.”There were high pressure situations in the game that we probably could have dealt with a bit better,” Warburton said.”Any team will tell you the morning after a win is a much better buzz.”But the group of guys we have got are hugely motivated for what’s around the corner. As long as we learn from this game, we take it on the chin and look forward to the Maori which is a huge challenge.”Photo: PHOTOSPORT James Haskell of the Lions acknowledges the crowd following their loss to the Highlanders.last_img read more

Connect, Communicate, Care

first_imgWorld Suicide Prevention DayThe Indian Action Committee (IAC) joins the rest of the global community in observance of World Suicide Prevention Day under the theme, “Connect, Communicate, Care”.In a statement, the IAC noted that the organisation believed that while the declaration has not been realised, it was still profoundly useful.The IAC supports the efforts of the Government of Guyana; the Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs); religious bodies; trade unions and civil society to mitigate this societal evil which has devastating effect.IAC commended all those who continue to work to reduce instances of suicide and expressed the hope that much-needed national interventions would be forthcoming.In 2003, the IAC established its focus on suicide prevention as part of its social work programmes, predominantly in Indo-Guyanese communities.In light of the spiralling number of suicides and related deaths over the past two years, the IAC made a national call for suicide to be declared a national priority. It is the belief of the IAC that this call will bring the necessary focus and resources to help realise a decline in suicide through education and other related interventions.The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that over 800,000 people die by suicide each year – that’s one person every 40 seconds. Up to 25 times as many again attempt suicide. The tragic ripple effect means that there are many, many more people who have been bereaved by suicide or have been close to someone who has tried to take his or her own life. And this is happening in spite of the fact that suicide is preventable.This year’s theme, “Connect, Communicate, Care” are at the heart of suicide prevention.last_img read more

South Asians living in the United States more likely to die of

first_imgRelated StoriesImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsMaternal proximity to oil and gas areas associated with congenital heart defects in babiesTestosterone replacement therapy associated with increased risk of stroke, heart attackThe statement also focuses on behavioral factors that may increase the risk of developing atherosclerosis among South Asian Americans and suggests ways that they can be changed to improve health.Volgman notes that diet is a key factor – many South Asians, even if they are vegetarians, eat a lot of saturated fats from tropical oils – such as palm and coconut oil – and refined carbohydrates, – such as sugar, white bread and highly processed foods.Ongoing studies are looking into improving diet quality among South Asians by reintroducing traditional whole grains which were once a mainstay of diet in the region, in addition to suggesting replacing ghee (butter with all the water removed) with monounsaturated oils, such as olive, corn or other oils.South Asian Americans also engage in less physical activity than other minority group members, according to the statement “As healthcare providers, we need to do a better job of helping our South Asian patients understand the importance of exercise, because many don’t realize how important it is to their health,” said Volgman. A recent study found that only 49 percent of South Asian Americans believed that exercise was important in preventing heart disease.The authors cite studies that suggest that community programs that encourage South Asians to exercise and reduce stress through yoga and Bollywood dancing or other culturally specific physical activities are likely to be more successful than other forms of physical activity. South Asians represent one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the U.S. The statement concludes with a call to action to include more South Asians in research studies to better understand how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. May 24 2018South Asians are more likely to die of heart disease, such as heart attacks and strokes caused by atherosclerosis – the disease process that narrows arteries – than East Asians and non-Hispanic whites living in the United States, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in its journal Circulation.The statement provides an overview of the behaviors that influence the risk factors for heart disease and stroke among South Asians living in the United States based on a review of existing scientific research.”Statistics about heart disease and stroke risk among Asians can be deceiving when all people of Asian ethnicity are combined into one group. Overall, Asians are at a lower risk for heart disease and stroke compared to people of European ancestry. But when you look at South Asians – both immigrants and people of South Asian ancestry born in the United States – their risk for heart disease and stroke is higher than people from East Asia and people of European ancestry,” said Annabelle S. Volgman, M.D., chair of the statement’s writing group and professor of medicine at Rush Medical College and medical director of the Rush Heart Center for Women in Chicago, Illinois.More than 3.4 million people who identify themselves as South Asians live in the United States, and about 80 percent come from India. Others come from Bangladesh, Bhutan, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. This group includes both immigrants and people of South Asian ancestry who were born in America, according to the United States Census.Compared to people of European ancestry South Asian Americans: have a greater risk of having severe atherosclerosis – the narrowing of the arteries that underlies most heart disease and strokes; are more likely to have multiple segments of their arteries narrowed by atherosclerosis; have higher levels of artery clogging LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and lower levels of HDL (good) cholesterol, which predispose the arteries to develop fatty deposits in artery walls that cause them to narrow; have a higher level of calcium deposits, a marker for atherosclerosis, if they are of Indian ancestry and over age 60; are more likely to have diabetes, which is believed to accelerate atherosclerosis; and develop diabetes at a younger age.center_img Source:https://newsroom.heart.org/news/south-asian-americans-are-at-high-risk-for-heart-disease-and-stroke?preview=cf29d266bee4e6d4d857654df085d68alast_img read more