Arcata baseball sweeps doubleheader against Fortuna to move into tie for second place in Big 5

first_imgArcata >> With plenty riding on Saturday afternoon’s doubleheader, Arcata head coach Troy Ghisetti turned things over to two of the Tigers’ youngest players to get the job done on the hill.The Tigers’ longtime head coach’s plan worked out to near-perfection.Freshman lefty Merick Sears and sophomore right-hander Jaden Gorge limited the hot-hitting Fortuna Huskies to all of 10 hits on Saturday afternoon at the Arcata Ball Park, as the Tigers’ young hurlers led their team to 8-0 and 7-0 wins on …last_img read more

Fishing the North Coast: Chetco Bubble fishery kicking out some big kings

first_imgThe Chetco bubble season got off to another slow start, but quickly rebounded with plenty of big kings hitting the net over the weekend. “Fishing was fair on Saturday and good on Sunday once everyone figured out where the fish were,” said Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing out of Brookings. “Big swells to 10 feet and strong northwest winds made trolling tough at times, but good numbers of salmon were holding between Salmon Rock and the red buoy. Sand was churned up from the swell, so Fish Flash …last_img read more

Can Warriors’ Damion Lee cement an NBA future?

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!MEMPHIS – In a little less than a week, Damion Lee will chart out a goal he hoped to accomplish this season with the Golden State Warriors.The goal: play well enough that an NBA team has no choice but to keep him on its roster.“I have to keep proving myself and trying to get better,” said Lee, citing his defense and strength. “I’ll continue to try to grind and …last_img read more

More Reasons to Doubt Scientific Omniscience

first_img(Visited 446 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 We hear it all the time; 99% of scientists agree. All it takes, though, is one overlooked fact to tumble a consensus.Occasionally we take a look at matters other than creation and evolution, when they are instructive about the scientific process. The scientific consensus on climate change (previously known as “global warming”) is a case in point. Scientists have been so dogmatic about it they have convinced most major world governments to enact draconian measures to counteract it. Climate has changed drastically in the past before humans evolved, they will admit, but they insist that the current climate excursion was caused by people trying to increase their happiness and reduce their suffering. News about global warming often includes denunciations of President Donald Trump for pulling America out of the Paris Climate Accords.We don’t quote climate “denialists” to get into the mud on this issue. We just look at the secular news itself, which is almost uniformly on the side of the climate consensus, and ask questions (see this list for previous entries). We pass over the ridiculous stories about what’s coming with global warming, like this headline on Phys.org, “Competition between males improves resilience against climate change.” Claims like that nobody could ever know for sure. Instead, we focus on the epistemology of the consensus: how do they know what they claim to know about human culpability for a warming climate? Did the consensus take the following factors into account?These ‘Dirty’ Thunderstorms Fill Sky with As Much Smoke As Volcanic Eruption (Live Science). Big volcanic eruptions, it is well known, can alter the climate. A well-known case was the Mt. Pinatubo eruption that reduced global temperatures for a time by 0.9° F in 1991. This article says that pyrocumulonimbus storms (pyroCb’s), or “dirty thunderstorms” fed by ash from wildfires, can put as much carbon smoke into the atmosphere as a volcano. “While such major volcanic events are sporadic, Peterson said, pyroCb events occur every year,” the article ends. “But scientists have not studied these storms enough to understand their potential impact on the climate.” Since wildfires are common, and have occurred long before man started burning coal or oil, would climate models produce different conclusions if pyroCbs were taken into account?Smoke from a relatively small wildfire.Tiny particles high up in the sky give insight into climate change (Phys.org). Black carbon (BC) can reflect incoming solar heat back into space, this article says. So can the clouds that form around the particles. Atmospheric particles, or aerosols, are thought to be the second or third most important factor after carbon dioxide. But do scientists understand its contribution? Note the uncertainty in this quote regarding a substantial contributor to climate change (which would seem to lower temperatures rather than raise them).Aerosols, tiny particles that are suspended in the atmosphere, contribute significantly towards climate change. However, despite their consequential role, aerosol interactions aren’t very well understood.The authors say that particles can last for years and influence regions far from cities with their pollution. The concentration of these particles over the Amazon Basin was higher than expected. Does this give anyone confidence in climate models, with their dire predictions of temperature changes a century away, specified in tenths of a degree? Yet those are the models used to scare politicians into taking drastic action.Microbes eat rocks and leave carbon dioxide (Science Magazine). This news item reveals that geologists and climatologists were wrong about silicate rocks acting as a carbon sink to counterbalance the outgassing of volcanoes. Microbes in the silicates can actually “eat” the rocks and release much of that carbon back into the atmosphere as CO2. A study of these rocks in Taiwan showed that “microbes oxidize roughly two-thirds of the petrogenic organic carbon there and that the rate of oxidation increases with the rate of erosion.”How does the Pacific Walker circulation respond to strong tropical volcanism? (Phys.org). Read this news item to get an idea of how complicated it is to tease out the significance of individual factors that might alter the climate. Severe volcanic eruptions (SVE’s), like the recent one in Bali, Indonesia, “can affect Earth’s climate.” But by how much? Trying to figure that out is complex, because a large eruption, which is unpredictable, can affect air currents in unexpected ways that are not well understood. Obviously humans are not responsible for what volcanoes do. Note, too, that SVEs tend to have a cooling effect. “The cooling effect from the SVEs is able to cool the entire tropics,” the article says, and yet the temperature anomalies that result are not uniform.Anthropogenic combustion iron as a complex climate forcer (Nature Communications). Even though this paper mentions a factor that might exacerbate warming, the key fact is that it was not taken into account before. “Our results demonstrate that anthropogenic combustion iron is a larger and more complex climate forcer than previously thought, and therefore plays a key role in the Earth system,” the authors say. This should lead thoughtful observers to ask what other factors have not been considered, that could be larger or smaller than previously thought?The Politics of Climate ChangeRepublicans more persuasive than scientists on climate change (Science Daily). This article, pretending to be an unbiased analysis of political attitudes about climate change, ends up as a partisan advocacy piece. The authors of a psychological survey at the University of Connecticut seem disturbed that Republicans who argue against anthropogenic climate change are more persuasive than the scientific consensus. But rather than see if Republican counter-arguments have merit, the authors delve into ways to package consensus arguments in more persuasive ways. They assume that Republicans are engaging in misinformation. “Citing Republican elites who endorse the scientific consensus on climate change may be the most effective way to persuade citizens that climate change is a real and important problem,” says Lyle Scruggs, a professor of political science at University of Connecticut. “That may be a step forward in reducing the partisan gap in public opinion on the subject.” Anyone smell partisanship in that comment?In closing, maybe it’s worth asking what the ruckus is about. Mike Wall wrote on Space.com, “Life on Venus? Why It’s Not an Absurd Thought.” Venus, we note, is a very warm planet. Astrobiologist David Grinspoon says that the atmosphere a few dozen miles up is pretty benign – if the Venusians can tolerate the sulfuric acid. So why worry? If climate change wipes out human society, some scientists, like the misanthrope Eric Pianka who wants to solve overpopulation of stupid people by releasing atmospheric ebola to kill billions of people indiscriminately, might be happy. Darwin will ensure that the next generation of organisms on earth will be heat-tolerant, acid-tolerant, and will vote Democrat. That’s not an absurd thought at all, now is it? Not for the scientific consensus.Dr Eric Pianka, ardent evolutionist and genocide advocate, by J B Greene. Used by permission.last_img read more

Geocaching a geothermal geocache (GC25643)—Geocache of the Week

first_imgIceland’s Blue LagoonNo doubt if you plan to visit Iceland, you will probably plan to work a visit to the Blue Lagoon into your itinerary. With its otherworldly landscape, promoted benefits to your health, and mix of rugged rocks and modern architecture, it’s obvious to see why it’s the country’s top destination.You don’t need to enter the spa to log this EarthCache. But if you do, know that the waters are rich in minerals, and bathing in the Blue Lagoon is reputed to help people suffering from skin diseases such as psoriasis. The temperature in the bathing and swimming areas of the lagoon are warm to quite steamy-hot. The Blue Lagoon also operates a research and development facility to help find cures for other skin ailments using the mineral-rich water.No need to enter the spa to log this EarthCacheHow did this come to be? In 1976, a pool of wastewater formed near the geothermal power plant that had just been built. In 1981, people started bathing in it after its supposed healing powers were popularized. In 1992, the Blue Lagoon company was established, and the bathing facility was opened for the public.So no, the Blue Lagoon is not a natural phenomenon; it’s actually created by the runoff from the nearby geothermal plant. But it’s fascinating, nevertheless. Check out what some geocachers have to say about this geothermal geocache:EarthCache logging is tough businessDiabolic27Brilliant trip. Went in 54 yrs old and emerged a mere 21(again). Well worth a visit.Soapy JoeWell the sun actually came out today, for the first time during our trip. What an odd feeling to be bobbing away in warm water when the air temperature was 3 degrees! Made the sprint to the changing rooms even colder than normal! Thank for placing this cache at this iconic location. TFTC BeinhartWe had already visited a geothermal plant, so we knew what is done here. It is fascinating that a company uses the geothermal power, can sell electricity and hot water and that they can even make money from the “waste” (the used water) by building a bath, a hotel and by selling beauty products and other stuff under the name “Blue Lagoon”.Hot spot in the lagoon are near the steam ventsYup. It’s cold outside the spa!Now THAT’S a wet bar!Mud maskMud maskSoak it all inContinue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.Share with your Friends:More Location:IcelandN 63° 52.810 W 022° 26.976 EarthCacheGC25643by goldohulk SharePrint RelatedCome on in, the water’s fine. — Blue Lagoon (GC25643) — Geocache of the WeekApril 9, 2014In “Community”11 stunning EarthCaches and how to find themJune 17, 2015In “Geocaching Info”Geocaching country souvenir: MaltaDecember 7, 2017In “News” Difficulty:1.5Terrain:1.5last_img read more

A Bias for Action and Locus of Control

first_imgThe organizational development class I was taking at Harvard Business School included a group project. The project was based on a scenario in which all the members of the group were in a hypothetical plane crash in what the script called “the Canadian swamplands.”The exercise required each member of the group to look at a list of resources available and put them in order based on their importance to survival. The list included things like the tires from the plane’s landing gear, pills that would purify water, matches, the fuel from the aircraft, and about 15 other items.Each member of the group was to share their ranking with their team and make one single decision: Do you stay put and wait for help, or do you attempt to cross the 50 miles of “Canadian swamplands,” and make it to the nearest town.As we ranked the items, we learned from each other. I ranked the pills that would purify water as my number one resource. One of the members of my group, however, was a doctor, and he insisted that in the Canadian area where we were stranded, the water was cleaner than almost any water found on earth. He said to throw the pills away. We all went through the exercise of discussing each item and re-ranking them based on the knowledge of the entire group. We were smarter together than we were alone. (Out of 125 or so people, no one had a worse first ranking of these items than me, and no one had a greater improvement after re-ranking them with their peers).That learning outcome by itself would’ve been enough, but we still had to answer the question as to whether or not to stay put or attempt to cross 50 miles of harsh terrain. Of the 10 or so people in the group, only one of us suggested that we cross the 50 miles together. That one person was me. I have a strong bias for action.At the time I was taking this class, I was routinely riding a bicycle 100 miles every Saturday and another 75 or more miles every Sunday, in addition to what I rode throughout the week. Fifty miles is a long way to walk, and over tough terrain, it would be even worse. I believed it could be done, and argued that the tires from the airplane and the rope we had recovered from the plane crash would allow us to cross the water safely. But my peers argued vociferously against my plan. They won the argument, but I negotiated that we would wait three days, and then we would walk together to the closest town.The Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer who showed up on a videotape to describe our situation and what the right choices were suggested that we would have likely been lost and died had we tried to cross the 50 miles. He said it was better and more likely that we would have been found had we simply waited to be rescued. Honestly, I am not very good at waiting. Riding 100+ miles dressed in lycra with only water and a few energy bars would have given me the confidence to give it a go and start walking, even though I liked the idea of catching the tires on fire to generate enough smoke to allow rescuers to locate my team.As I am reading Charles Duhigg’s new book, Smarter, Faster, Better, I am reminded that a “bias for action” and a “locus of control,” (believing that you have a choice and can complete some arduous task) is the foundation of motivation. When we win deals, we talk about what we did to win, as if it was all our volition. When we lose deals, we pretend that certain factors beyond our control caused our loss, that we were powerless. The problem with believing that forces beyond your control are what causes your losses is disempowering. It means that you have no control, that you have to sit passively while the world acts on you.The time to take the actions that ensure you win deals-or greatly improve your chances—is now. The time to deal without whatever obstacle you believe will cause you to lose is before you have lost. No one is coming to rescue you and your deal. You are going to have to save yourself. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Serena Williams beats Maria Sharapova for Olympic tennis gold

first_imgSerena Williams became only the second woman to complete a career Golden Slam when she won her first singles gold medal Saturday by beating Maria Sharapova 6-0, 6-1 at the London Olympics.The victory completed a remarkable run of domination by the No. 4-seeded Williams, who lost only 17 games in her six matches. She went 13-0 this summer at the All England Club, where she won her fifth Wimbledon title a month ago.The career Golden Slam was first achieved by Steffi Graf, who did it when she won the Olympics in 1988 after winning all four major titles. Williams can add the gold medal to her 14 Grand Slam singles championships, the most of any active woman.last_img read more

10 months agoLuiz insists Chelsea in the title race

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Luiz insists Chelsea in the title raceby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea defender David Luiz insists they’re in the title race.Chelsea are fourth in the table ahead of their match against Leicester at Stamford Bridge on Saturday and go into the festive period looking to make it three league wins in a row.”Everybody knows the Premier League is so difficult, we have to think step by step,” the Brazil international told Sky Sports News.”Of course the boss tries to give us the maths and to give us one direction to follow and we trying to get the points to be there and fighting for the title not just for the top four.”It’s not my first Premier League [season] so I know anything can happen.” last_img read more

10 months agoDalian Yifang attacker Carrasco in contact with Arsenal

first_imgDalian Yifang attacker Carrasco in contact with Arsenalby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBelgium winger Yannick Carrasco has emerged as a target for Arsenal.Sky Italia says the 25-year-old left Atletico Madrid to join Chinese Super League side Dalian Yifang in February last year.Arsenal have made initial contact with the Belgian international, who has given his ‘approval’ to the move.Carrasco is said to be open to moving to the Premier League with the Gunners now favourites for his signature.Milan had been keen on Carrasco and the player even liked a social media post about a potential move to the San Siro.But there are doubts over whether Milan would be able to afford the deal, with Carrasco currently pocketing around £170,000-a-week in China. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more