Arcata baseball sweeps doubleheader against Fortuna to move into tie for second place in Big 5

first_imgArcata >> With plenty riding on Saturday afternoon’s doubleheader, Arcata head coach Troy Ghisetti turned things over to two of the Tigers’ youngest players to get the job done on the hill.The Tigers’ longtime head coach’s plan worked out to near-perfection.Freshman lefty Merick Sears and sophomore right-hander Jaden Gorge limited the hot-hitting Fortuna Huskies to all of 10 hits on Saturday afternoon at the Arcata Ball Park, as the Tigers’ young hurlers led their team to 8-0 and 7-0 wins on …last_img read more

Weather, tariffs, lack of planting yields increasing farm stress

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Kolt BuchenrothThe stagnant commodity prices, an ongoing trade war, and the uncertainty of tariffs impacting the farm economy are reason enough to induce plenty of stress in a farmer’s life. Add in the unprecedented rainfall most of the Buckeye State has seen this spring, rising input costs, and market volatility and Ohio’s agriculture community is facing a perfect storm for developing high levels of farm stress.Ohio State University Family and Consumer Science Extension Educator Jami Delllifield is advocating around the state and the country for the mental health of the agriculture community. She has taken note of the heightened farm stress situation this growing season.“We can’t control this. There is absolutely nothing right now that is within anyone’s control. Everything is just coming at us and it just seems to keep building. Plus, farmers are at an increased risk because their profession is isolated. They spend all day and night alone in a tractor with their thoughts,” Delliefield said.But, the idea of farm stress can be rooted much deeper than a single growing season or bad crop.“Farmers are wired to protect their land. We will do whatever it takes to protect what is ours. That includes our legacy,” Delliefield said. “There is a feeling of not only letting your family down, but letting down dad, grandpa, and the past generations of the farm.”While farmers are worrying about planting and doing field work, they also have to be worried about the operations of the rest of their farm.“The other piece that sets agriculture apart is for most of us, the companies we work for provide our facilities and equipment. It’s not our responsibility to keep the lights on and pay the rent. For a farmer, that isn’t the case. If the electric bill gets paid, if the crops go in, if the soils aren’t ideal, it’s all personal and it all adds stress,” Dellifield said.She continued to say that it can be challenging for those not engaged in agriculture to help producers when they don’t understand that legacy piece. Friends, neighbors, and spouses are the best eyes and ears to know if something could be wrong. Dellifield has some advice of signs to watch for as you visit the coffee shop in the morning or church on Sunday.“The first thing you want to look at is ‘are people showing up?’ This is a fight or flight response and people may come out with guns blazing, or they may be isolated,” she said. “It is perfectly okay to say ‘Today isn’t a good day. I’m feeling a little stressed.’ When one person starts talking about it, it’s likely someone else going through the same hardships will talk about it. Then, there is a community to come together and support one another.”Family members can also look for changes in drinking habits.“Another thing to watch for is someone who used to have a single alcoholic beverage with dinner now having two or three, or other increased drinking habits. Or, they might just not seem like themselves,” Dellifield said.When it comes to managing stress and specific to agriculture, there are resources available.“Think of a time when you overcame something that seemed insurmountable and hold onto that. Then, surround yourself with people that will help pull you through.” Dellifield said.Prior to her start in Extension four years ago, Dellifield had a background in psychology. Dellifield is on a multi-state team that works with the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development from the Farm Service Agency.“We facilitate trainings for county level FSA employees on what to do so they can help producers when they come in. That way, if they are seeing signs and symptoms, they know how they can help,” Dellifield said.Dellifield serves on a team that partners Extension with Ohio State’s College of Public Health. The group has just been awarded a grant to bring Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training to the rural parts of Ohio.“Just like we need first aid and CPR if someone has a heart attack right in front of us, we need to know how to have conversations and identify signs and symptoms,” Dellifield said. “We are compiling resources for anyone that lives in the state of Ohio — from doctors to producers and veterinarians to seed salesmen.”Those resources will be available by the end of the year. More information on MHFA and becoming trained is available at mentalhealthfirstaid.org. Several other Extension resources are available by typing farm stress into an internet search engine. If you or someone you know is thinking of hurting themselves, the national suicide prevention lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. Individuals can also text the word “home” to 741741. Veterans can send a text to 838255 to be connected with specialized resources. As always, in emergency situations, dial 9-1-1.last_img read more

Screenwriter Patricia Resnick on Altman, Mad Men, and Working 9 to 5

first_imgPatricia Resnick has worked on an impressive array of projects throughout her career. Here’s what she has to say about the craft and the industry.Patricia Resnick had more than a cup of ambition when she started writing films with Robert Altman, working with Dolly Parton on 9 to 5, and tackling the mad landscape of television.  We sat down with Resnick for a candid discussion about storytelling, her creative and personal journeys, and dancing with the First Lady. Yes, dancing with the First Lady.  We’ll get to that.Image courtesy of Patrica Resnick.PremiumBeat: You’ve had an amazing career so far, which is no small feat for a woman starting out in the late ’70s. You’ve worked with Robert Altman on three films: 3 Women, A Wedding, and Quintet. How did that relationship develop, and what was the creative process like for you?Patricia Resnick: Atman had a number of strong women around him. For example, Scott Bushnell (a woman). She was very important to him. Nashville had a female screenwriter — Joan Tewkesbury. I never saw him have an issue with gender.I met him when I was in college at USC as a cinema major, which meant I was in my car a lot. When I was driving through the streets whenever I saw something that was filming, I would stop and park and ask what it was. I was from Miami Beach, and we didn’t have productions there, so it was all so fascinating.One day, it was an Altman film, and I happened to be writing a paper on him for film class. So I waited for him to come out of his office and introduced myself and asked him if I could interview him. He said yes, and when I had finished my paper, I dropped it off. He read it, loved it, and wanted me to work for him.Image via Buffalo Bill and the Indians (United Artists).The problem was he didn’t have the money to pay me. I was able to get a 90-day grant to be the assistant to the publicist for Buffalo Bill and the Indians. I tried to make myself indispensable. I knew I had 90 days to make myself essential before the grant money was over. It worked. He kept me on, and I ended up writing a treatment for him for 3 Women.He didn’t see me as a writer at first. During the first two years I worked with him, I did other projects. I wrote a spec script and ended up writing two skits for Lily Tomlin’s Broadway show, Appearing Nitely. Altman came to see it and finally said, “The kid can write.” Then I wrote on A Wedding for him. I was 24.image via The Player (Warner Bros).PB:  You also played yourself in The Player. How did that happen?PR: That was way later, in 1992! He was doing the opening shot, and his idea was to make it all people who had worked with him. He put Buck Henry, Alan Rudolph, Joan Tewkebury, and me together and told Joan and me “I want you to do your own pitch.”  She didn’t want to do it, so I put together a silly version of something I had vaguely in my mind already. We shot it all in half a day.I had a bit of nostalgia recently with that scene. The studio where we are shooting the Netflix series Tales of the City is the same place where we shot The Player. I kept feeling something was familiar and then recently re-watched The Player with friends, and it all came back.Image via 9 to 5 (Twentieth Century Fox).PB: It’s so hard not to geek out getting into your next project after the Altman credits: 9 to 5. In 1980 when you wrote that screenplay, it was a pretty radical comedy. Did you have any notion that it would be such an important film for women and still be relevant enough today to be remade?PR: I knew opening day. Not at the premiere, but opening day in theaters. I remember seeing the line for it and then turning the corner and seeing that the line went all the way down the block. Then hearing the audience laughing and responding. It was thrilling.We are opening the stage play musical on the West End in London on January 28. When the play premiered on Broadway in 2009, we took a pretty hard hit from critics — mostly male critics. The feeling at the time was that the message of the play was dated because the male journalists were certain the sexism problem had been solved. Considering the current climate . . .PB: Yes. And of course you have your secret weapon again: Dolly Parton. I’m amazed that after all these years, she continues to give such love to 9 to 5! Any thoughts why?PR: It was her first movie role ever. It really put her on the map in terms of being an actress. I also think the three women did and do like each other, and it was a happy time. We all saw the film go from a comedy that did well in the theater to something more iconic.In terms of the musical stage version, I don’t know if writing a musical had been a dream of hers, but Dolly always loves new challenges, and she loves to create, and she loves to write songs.Whenever she is in town and doing a show, I try to go, and as soon as the first chords of 9 to 5 begin, the crowd goes nuts. It’s really amazing to witness.Image via Mad Men (Lionsgate Television).PB:  Recently, you’ve concentrated more on TV. You were a consulting producer on Mad Men and have written TV movies as well as episodes for other series. Why did you make the move? Are we doing the most interesting work on television these days?PR: Basically, yeah. In the mid-’90s, feature work was drying up for me. Because the kind of movies that I wrote weren’t really being made any more. Comic book movies were happening, and it’s not what I write.I had young kids, and I didn’t want to staff with TV because that would have been a lot of hours away from them, so I wrote TV movies and the animated show, Olivia. I worked on plays and pilots. When the kids were in high school and off at college, at that point, it was the second golden age of television. I thought I could go staff because eleventh graders don’t want to see you much anyway.I was such a huge fan of Mad Men, and it was so great to get my first staff job on that show. It was an incredible room of smart people dedicated to doing their best work.Image via Mad Men (Lionsgate Television).PB: First job in film with Robert Altman. First job on staff with Matt Weiner and Mad Men. Not too shabby. What’s the writer’s room like for a character-driven show like Mad Men?PR: It’s actually more plot-driven than you would think. I came in for the last season of Mad Men. When you are in the seventh season of anything, characters are set, and the main question becomes what experience do we want to leave everyone? Matt came in and talked to us about emotionally the feeling that he wanted and about a book he had read over the summer, Siddhartha (by Herman Hesse.) It doesn’t have any correlation to our plot, but the story deals with the spiritual journey of self-discovery, which is very much Don’s path.Tales of the City set. (Image courtesy of Patricia Resnick.)PB: Do you have a consistent way of working when you start a screenplay or teleplay? Do you write a treatment or outline, do character bios before you write, or is it a more freeform process?PR: Ideas. As a general rule, something will pop into my head, but mostly I’m not that lucky. I will have to make time to think about what’s going on in the world or in my life and see if that is fertile ground to bring it to life. To have the germ of the idea for something that is pitchable is the hardest part. Developing it is the hardest part — and having to abandon some things.  Sometimes it’s a good idea, but I’m not the best writer for it. A spy thriller, for example, I might not pursue. I spend a lot of time in cars, so I ponder while driving.Every year what you need to sell something is more and more in depth. In the ’80s I once sold a very brief pitch. Gave him two lines and sold it on the phone. That doesn’t happen anymore. So now, they want things unbelievably worked out, and as far as TV, they really want all the characters, the first season, where you plan to end up. Visual aids. Look books — to people actually doing trailers for things that have not been shot. Big boards and Power Points — you really have to have things nailed down and worked out.I will get random ideas. Oh this is a good character or scene. I’ll just make notes on my phone (because I’m usually out when they come to me) and then when I feel ready, I sit down and put it together into something coherent.Once I have it, I’ll go to my agents and say “I’m kinda working on this idea,” and either they will respond or not. If it seems viable, then we start the process of trying to put the pieces together. First thing is to get a producer, and often you work with them on the pitch, and by the time you pitch to a studio and studio to network, it all evolves. It’s a very long process and often a lot of work for no money. Most don’t get sold and most don’t get made.PB: What’s the most thrilling part for you — writing, filming, or watching?PR: Writing remains a hard thing to do, and when you’re having a good day and you are really in the zone, that is a great feeling, and that is the only moment that is completely pure — no one’s touched it, changed it. It’s purely yours.In terms of watching it filmed, totally depends. In features, unless you are writer/director, most directors do not want you around. It’s weird — you are visitor, but it was yours.In TV, often the creator is the show runner. So even as a TV staff writer, you’re wanted on set. Some writers like being on set; some loathe it. As far as realized. Depends on how I feel about it. It often isn’t how you think it will be. I’ve had awful creative experiences that produced good results and [for] others loved the process and the film did not do well.Image courtesy Patricia Resnick.PB:  You’ve been very open in the past regarding your personal life. You are very out, you gave up drinking, raised two children on your own. How have the challenges in your personal life affected your art — for good or bad?PR: I think I was really lucky because I stopped drinking at 32. I didn’t have a really low bottom, and I could see what was coming, and I was ambitious. I could never write drunk. So I would write sober during the day and drink at night. It was getting in the way of life and happiness. And I didn’t really start drinking until my mid-twenties. So it was a short seven-year period. I am so grateful social media didn’t exist then. It would have absolutely ruined my career.My sexuality? I think my sexuality influenced my art as it gave me somewhat of an outsider perspective. A lot of wonderful artistic creations stem from a feeling like I don’t fit in.  Most people feel like they didn’t fit in for many reasons, and that informed my thought process and how I thought about the world and how I saw the world.In terms of being a female creative, I wasn’t raised to think any opportunity was beyond me, but knowing how incredibly sexist this business is, it probably kept things from me. But if you don’t get a job, you don’t know why. Is it because I am a woman or am I too old? You just don’t know.Raising kids affected my career because I was a single parent, and I didn’t want to take a job that was going to keep me gone. I wanted to direct, and it was hard with my lifestyle. I had the chance to direct and write a short for Showtime, and I just couldn’t leave my kids. I wanted to be able to take them to school and do all that stuff, and I for sure passed on some great opportunities in my peakish years. I made some decisions of what I would do based on them. I don’t regret but it, but sometimes I look at my bank account . . . but it was the right decision. It also gave me new material. Now that they are in their twenties, it keeps me in touch with youth in a way that my friends that don’t have kids are quite unaware of. I’ve been lucky that I’ve been staffing. The vast majority of the writers I work with are in their thirties, so I have a lot of close friends that are young, and I love learning new things and new worlds from them.PB:  Finally, I have to ask about Nancy Reagan. You asked her to dance at a wedding. She said yes. How did that happen? And please tell us there is a story in the works about your moxie!PR: I was at a big Hollywood wedding. It was July of 1986. After that happened, I thought I shouldn’t drink out of the house and then later, I got sober in April of ’86.  It was Lucy Fisher and Doug Wick’s wedding. They own a very successful production company: Red Wagon. Doug’s father worked for Reagan, so he invited Nancy.I was sitting at a table with Sue Mengers, (very significant talent agent), and Nancy Reagan was dancing with the groom. Sue said “I’ll pay five hundred dollars to anyone who cuts in on the First Lady,” and it sounded good to me. That was a lot of money.  So I just went in and cut in, and she said yes.Chances are, it won’t go into a script, but I am toying with the idea of some version of a memoir, and the dancing with Nancy story? That would be the crown jewel.Cover image via Mad Men.Looking for more industry interviews? Check these out.Interview: Composer Federico Jusid Makes Some Noise in HollywoodInterview: Tips for Crowdfunding Over $100,000 for Your Documentary ProjectsAustin Film Festival Interview: Insights for Turning Your Script into a 90-Second Pitch5 Reasons Why You Should Shoot Your Own Digital Web SeriesInterview: Tracy Andreen on the Romance of Writing for Hallmarklast_img read more

Jose Mourinho worried by ‘very bad’ start to Manchester United’s pre-season

first_imgManchester United manager Jose Mourinho says the club’s pre-season campaign has got off to a “very bad” start ahead of the upcoming premier League season due to the absence of key players.The 20-time Premier League champions are without several World Cup participants, including France’s Paul Pogba, Belgium’s Romelu Lukaku and Marouane Fellaini, and England’s Jesse Lingard and Marcus Rashford among others, as they rest following a gruelling tournament.Chilean forward Alexis Sanchez is also absent from the camp due to visa issues.”The pre-season is very bad, the positive thing of the pre-season is only for the young boys that have a fantastic opportunity to train with us,” Mourinho told reporters.”I’m worried because I’m not training (with everyone) and then I go to the Premier League without lots of players, but it is what it is and we have to try and make the best out of it with the players we have here.The boss has given his thoughts on @PaulPogba’s “brilliant” #WorldCup campaign… #MUFC #MUTOUR pic.twitter.com/efVfZQEoFK Manchester United (@ManUtd) July 18, 2018″I’m not worried about playing Liverpool here or Real Madrid or Milan… I’m not worried if we lose badly.”United will play two friendlies, starting with Club America on Friday, ahead of next week’s International Champions Cup tournament, where they will face domestic rivals Liverpool, Champions League winners Real Madrid and Italy’s AC Milan.The Old Trafford side also play a friendly against German champions Bayern Munich on Aug. 5, five days before they kick off their league campaign against Leicester City.advertisement(With Reuters inputs)last_img read more

Video: Duke Basketball Releases Cool Video Celebrating All Of Coach K’s NBA Draft Picks

first_imgGrant Hill of Duke on draft day.Grant Hill DukeKentucky is the college basketball program that gets most of the love these days for producing NBA talent, but Duke has been pretty great at it, too. Since Mike Krzyzewski took over the Blue Devils’ program in 1980, he’s had 51 players get selected in the NBA Draft. Thursday night, he’ll add to that number, as Jahlil Okafor, Justise Winslow and Tyus Jones are all projected to get picked in the first round, with Quinn Cook a potential second-round pick. In anticipation of the draft, Duke has released a cool video celebrating all of Coach K’s NBA players.last_img read more

Welcome to New India Jairam Ramesh on Bombay HCs War and Peace

first_imgNew Delhi: Senior Congress leader Jairam Ramesh on Thursday termed “truly bizarre” the Bombay High Court asking an activist to explain why he kept a copy of Leo Tolstoy’s “War and Peace”. “Welcome to New India,” Ramesh said, a day after the Bombay High Court Wednesday asked Elgar Parishad-Bhima Koregaon case accused Vernon Gonsalves to explain why he kept “objectionable material” like a copy of Leo Tolstoy’s “War and Peace” and some CDs at his home. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details The single-judge bench of Justice Sarang Kotwal, hearing the bail plea of Gonsalves and others, also said “such books” and CDs prima facie indicated they contained some material against the State. “Truly bizarre that somebody is being asked by a judge of the Bombay High Court to explain why he has copy of Tolstoy’s War & Peace, a true classic. And to think Tolstoy was a major influence on the Mahatma. Welcome to New India!” Ramesh tweeted. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday The classic novel about Russia during Napoleonic wars became a point of contention after Pune Police claimed the book was part of the “highly incriminating evidence” it had seized from Gonsalves’ house in Mumbai during raids conducted a year ago. Pune Police also read out titles of several other books and CDs allegedly recovered from Gonsalves’ house, which included CDs titled ‘Rajya Daman Virodhi’ released by Kabir Kala Manch. “The title of the CD ‘Rajya Daman Virodhi’ itself suggests it has something against the state while ‘War and Peace’ is about a war in another country. Why did you (Gonsalves) keep objectionable material such as books like ‘War and Peace’, books and CDs at home? You will have to explain this to the court,” said Justice Kotwal.last_img read more

Giuliana And Bill Rancic Support Cord Blood Registry

first_imgGiuliana and Bill Rancic are gearing up for baby – and planning to bank the baby’s cord blood. This week, the couple is receiving the CBR (Cord Blood Registry) kit!Bill and Giuliana with a CBR KitCredit/Copyright: Elizabeth Messina via www.PitchPublicRelations.comGiuliana and Bill are arranging to have their newborn son’s umbilical cord blood stored shortly after birth. The blood in the umbilical cord is rich in healthy stem cells that can be used in transplants to treat a variety of illnesses, including leukemia and sickle-cell disease, or for certain injuries.The Rancics, who are the new spokespersons for Cord Blood Registry, believe that banking their son’s cord blood is a smart move.Stem cells are the body’s building blocks for organ tissue, blood, and the immune system. Doctors started using cord blood stem cells more than 20 years ago to treat diseases that previously had been treated with bone marrow. Today, the primary type of stem cells in umbilical cord blood – called hematopoietic – help treat many serious illnesses and disorders.last_img read more

Jordan Spieth Played A Great Masters And So Did The Rest Of

After an absolutely scorching first three rounds of the 2015 Masters, 21-year-old Jordan Spieth shot a 2-under-par 70 Sunday to finish off his first major championship victory. Giving the performance even more historical import, Spieth’s 72-hole score of 270 — 18 strokes under par — tied Tiger Woods’s 1997 record for the lowest score in the tournament’s long history. It was undoubtedly one of the most dominant performances ever seen at Augusta National.But was it the most dominant? Relative to the field, probably not, because not all 72-hole scores are created equal.When Woods shot his 270, the average player to make the cut in the Masters shot a 3-over-par 291, which ranks 31st-lowest out of the 79 Masters staged since the tournament began in 1934. Woods’s score, then, was 21 strokes better than the field average for players who completed all 72 holes, the fourth-best mark relative to the field in Masters history. (No. 1 was Cary Middlecoff, whose 279 was 24.8 strokes better than average in 1955, two years before the tournament instituted a 36-hole cut.)In 2015, the field averaged a 72-hole score of 285.6, 2.4 strokes better than par — the third-lowest average in tournament history — meaning the typical player in this year’s Masters took 5.4 fewer strokes than in Woods’s record-setting year. In turn, Spieth’s 270 was only 15.6 strokes better than the field average, a mark that ranks just 42nd among 72-hole scores since 1934.In fairness to Spieth, 37 of the 41 players ahead of him on that list put up their scores before the Masters started cutting the field down after 36 holes in 1957. Before that, scores such as Charles Kunkle’s 340 in 1956 polluted the overall field averages, making top-of-the-leaderboard performances look far better by comparison. But even if we limit our sample of tournaments to 1957 and later, Spieth’s -15.6 mark relative to the field ranks fifth-best, trailing not only Woods’s in 1997, but also Masters wins by Raymond Floyd, Jack Nicklaus and Phil Mickelson:The rest of the field was so good this year that a record four players shot 11-under-par or better, and 58 percent of all players who made the cut broke par. Even without including Spieth’s 270, the rest of the field averaged a score of 285.9, the third-lowest 72-hole average for non-winners since 1957:This doesn’t take much shine off Spieth’s week at Augusta, of course. He’s only 21, the same age as Woods in 1997; Nicklaus was 25, Floyd was 33 and Mickelson was 39 when they posted superior performances relative to opponents playing the same course under the same conditions. But as long as par isn’t what the typical player shoots, the field average should always be taken into account when comparing scores across tournaments and eras — and in Spieth’s case, that slightly lowers the historical significance of his 2015 performance. read more

Ohio State announces Larry Johnson as assistant head coach and defensive line

Larry Johnson watches the team practice before the Blue and White scrimmage April 20 at Beaver Stadium.Credit: Courtesy of Daily CollegianLarry Johnson is officially an Ohio State Buckeye.OSU made the announcement Wednesday, naming Johnson the next assistant head coach and defensive line coach for the Buckeyes, according to a press release.“I am very pleased that Larry Johnson is an Ohio State Buckeye,” OSU coach Urban Meyer said in the release. “I have great respect for him as a family man, as a coach and mentor of young men and as a recruiter. He is an outstanding addition to our coaching staff.”Johnson spent the last 18 years of his career at Penn State, including overseeing the entire defensive line for the last 14 years. He also spent 20 years coaching high school football in Maryland and Virginia, according to the release.“In just a few hours I can tell that Ohio State cares about football,” Johnson said in the release. “There is a winning tradition that is important here. They care about academics and they care about players, and I like the way coach Urban Meyer approaches things. He’s a great teacher. He is very organized and this is what I was looking for.”Johnson is set to replace former Buckeye defensive line coach Mike Vrabel, who announced via Twitter Jan. 9 he was leaving OSU to take a job with the Houston Texans of the NFL. Vrabel’s jump to the NFL comes after Houston announced the hiring of former Penn State head coach Bill O’Brien Jan. 3.While coaching at Penn State, six of Johnson’s defensive linemen were first-round NFL Draft selections, most recently Jared Odrick in 2010. Johnson also coached seven first-team All-Americans on the defensive line in his time at State College, Pa., including Courtney Brown, who was picked No. 1 overall in the NFL Draft in 2000.Since 1996, Johnson’s first season with the Nittany Lions, no other Big Ten team has had as many players from one position win Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year than the five defensive ends Johnson coached.“I am really impressed with the Ohio State players. I just met a group of players, walked out of the room and thought, ‘wow,’ these are kinds of players I want to coach,” Johnson said. “They were really impressive.”Johnson, who grew up in Williamston, N.C., coached a defense that led the nation in sacks from 2005-09. He focuses on fundamentals and forming relationships with the players he coaches, according to the release.“I’m a relationship guy and I think in order to get the best out of your players you have to develop relationships,” Johnson said in a released statement. “I’m also a teacher. I like to teach the basic fundamentals of football. I want guys who are fundamentally sound and have the ability to play fast and to play relentless.”Johnson’s salary was not immediately available Wednesday evening, per OSU. The man he is replacing at OSU, Vrabel, earned a base salary of $291,004 last season, according to the USA TODAY coaches database.According to PennLive, Johnson was offered to remain as defensive line coach for the Nittany Lions by their new head coach — James Franklin — but declined.The Buckeyes are set to open their 2014 campaign Aug. 30 against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. read more

Brazils Ronaldo believes Salah is similar to Messi

first_imgBrazil great Ronaldo has admitted that he is a big fan of Mohamed Salah’s and even compared him to Lionel MessiThe Egyptian has scored 44 goals in all competitions for Liverpool in what has been a stunning maiden campaign for the Premier League side.Salah’s 10 goals in the Champions League has helped fire Liverpool to their first appearance in the final since 2007 and he is expected to be the main threat in their attempt to deny Real Madrid a third successive crown.Ronaldo, who only won the UEFA Cup with Inter Milan in 1998, has become a fan of Salah’s himself and believes that he shares similarities with Messi.“Salah, I love him. He is an incredible player with a tremendous quality,” said the Brazilian, according to beINSPORTS.divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“He looks like Messi. I recently read him saying that I had been his inspiration and I was excited.”However, the 41-year-old is expecting his former club Real to overcome Liverpool in the final.“My result is 3-2 for Madrid,” said Ronaldo.“If they win the final it will be an unprecedented event in their history. I am very optimistic.“There were doubts during the year, but Real Madrid came together and have achieved something historic.”last_img read more