Liberian Educator Wants Sector Decentralized

first_imgA Liberian Educator, Hester Williams Catakaw, has said that this time of the Ebola crisis provides the best opportunity to put things in the right perspective and plan for a dynamic educational program for Liberia.The plan, according to Madam Catakaw, will involve a system where the education sector has to be decentralized for all to equally benefit.She observed that this is the worst time for education in Liberia “because of the Ebola virus disease (EVD), which has completely paralyzed the entire country to the extent that school-going children are left to totter.”“This is the worst time because the EVD has infected so many people that all our schools and learning facilities have all remained closed.”However, she called on Liberian to use this “worst time” in education system to begin planning the best in sector.“Let us use this time to put things in the right perspective and plan for a dynamic educational program for Liberia,” Mrs. Catakaw averred.She also expressed concern about issue that has to do with the decentralization of educational activities, which according to her, is a paramount to the nation, adding that decentralizing the educational sector is more important to the country’s future generation than anything else.“I have spoken with so many people on this aspect of decentralization. We must decentralize education in Liberia now! 167 years of centralized education in Liberia has not worked for the betterment of the society,” Madam Catakaw—a renowned educator stated.In her analysis, the former deputy Education Minister for Instruction also stressed the importance of early childhood education, which according to her, will serve as a foundation to the building of a well formulated educational foundation for the country.Madam Catakaw said she has been on record since 2008, explaining to her colleagues in the sector and stakeholders in education the importance of early childhood education for.She then stressed the need of revisiting the current National Curriculum formulated by the Ministry of Education (MOE) for Liberian schools.“Look at your National Curriculum; it is not harmonized with the West Africa Secondary Schools Certificate Exams (WASSCE),” Madam Catakaw observed, among other things.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Teacher abuse

first_imgThose are the AP’s findings after reporters sought disciplinary records in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The result is an unprecedented national look at the scope of sex offenses by educators — by of breach of trust.The 7-month investigation found 2,570 educators whose teaching credentials were revoked, denied, voluntarily surrendered or limited from 2001 through 2005 following allegations of sexual misconduct.Young people were the victims in at least 1,801 of the cases, and more than 80 percent of those were students. More than half the educators who were punished by their states also were convicted of crimes related to the misconduct.The findings draw obvious comparisons to sex abuse scandals in other institutions, among them the Roman Catholic Church. A review by America’s Catholic bishops found that about 4,400 of 110,000 priests were accused of molesting minors from 1950 through 2002.Beyond the horror of individual crimes, the larger shame is the institutions that govern education have only sporadically addressed a problem that’s been apparent for years.“From my own experience — this could get me in trouble — I think every single school district in the nation has at least one perpetrator. At least one,” says Mary Jo McGrath, a Santa Barbara lawyer who has spent 30 years investigating misconduct in schools. “It doesn’t matter if it’s urban or rural or suburban.”Throughout the Southland there have been several examples of teachers who have continued to teach after being arrested for underage sex offenses, or who have not had their credentials immediately suspended.Eric Olsen, 29, a former substitute teacher in the Ontario-Montclair school district, was convicted of lewd acts with a minor after his June 2006 arrest.He said in a jailhouse interview that he allowed little girls to sit on his lap, and became sexually aroused.Olsen told police that he was banned from Central School District in Rancho Cucamonga in December and San Bernardino City Unified School District in April 2005 for similar actions.In the Central School District in Rancho Cucamonga, officials reported similar allegations about Olsen to the children’s services in December 2005, but the Sheriff’s Department said it has no record of the incident.Jelani Kimble, a substitute teacher from West Covina, was also arrested in June 2006, and later convicted of oral copulation with a 17-year-old girl from the class he was teaching at Northview High School.Although Kimble was convicted in August 2006, he did not have his teacher’s credentials suspended until November, and not revoked until February of this year, according to state documents.A teacher at Bonita High School, Walter Edward Babst, continued teaching for a week after being caught in January 2006 in a sex sting on camera for a “Dateline NBC” program in Riverside County.Babst’s defense lawyer and several local citizens who had seen ads for the TV program that showed Babst’s face called Bonita Unified School District and told them about him before Riverside County authorities got around to calling.Activist Terri Miller from the Las Vegas-based Stop Education Sexual Abuse, Misconduct, and Exploitation Organization calls the movement of a sexual offender from one school district to another without being flagged as an offender “passing the trash.”“We need laws that will aggressively hold accountable people who enable sex offenders by not reporting information on them to law enforcement,” Miller said.She noted that the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing state agency is very active in suspending teacher’s credentials when they get information from local school districts and law agencies.“The problem is often that local agencies just don’t make sure they tell the state,” Miller said.Like Olsen’s, the cases that the AP found were those of everyday educators — teachers, school psychologists, principals and superintendents among them. They’re often popular and recognized for excellence and, in nearly nine out of 10 cases, they’re male.While some were accused of abusing students in school, others were cited for sexual misconduct after hours that didn’t necessarily involve a kid from their classes.The overwhelming majority of cases involved public school teachers, since many private schools don’t require a teaching license.Two major teachers’ unions, the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association, each denounced sex abuse while emphasizing the need to consider educators’ rights.Kathy Buzad of the AFT said that “if there’s one incident of sexual misconduct between a teacher and a student that’s one too many.”In practice, the AP found less vigilance.The AP discovered efforts to stop individual offenders but, overall, a deeply entrenched resistance toward recognizing and fighting abuse. It starts in school hallways, where fellow teachers look away or feel powerless to help. School administrators make behind-the-scenes deals to avoid lawsuits and other trouble. And in state capitals and Congress, lawmakers shy from tough state punishments or any cohesive national policy for fear of disparaging a vital profession.Abuse also is treated with misplaced fascination in American culture.“It’s dealt with in a salacious manner with late-night comedians saying, ‘What 14-year-old boy wouldn’t want to have sex with his teacher?’ It trivializes the whole issue,” says Robert Shoop, a professor of educational administration at Kansas State University who wrote a book to help school districts deal with sexual misconduct.“In other cases, it’s reported as if this is some deviant who crawled into the school district — ‘and now that they’re gone, everything’s OK.’ But it’s much more prevalent than people would think.”He and others who track the problem reiterated one point repeatedly during the AP investigation: Very few abusers get caught.They point to academic studies estimating that only about one in 10 victimized children report sexual abuse of any kind to someone who can do something about it. When it is reported, teachers, administrators and some parents frequently don’t — or won’t — recognize the signs that a crime is taking place.“They can’t see what’s in front of their face. Not unlike a kid in an alcoholic family, who’ll say, ‘My family is great,’” says McGrath, the California lawyer and investigator who now trains school systems how to recognize what she calls the “red flags” of misconduct.In Arcadia, in 2003, some those “red flags” may have been apparent.During a molestation trial for onetime Arcadia High School English teacher Phillip Sutliff, now 35, of Azusa, a onetime cheerleading coordinator at a local park told how she was seduced by Sutliff in 1993.At the time, Sutliff worked at a nearby recreation center.Earlier this year Sutliff had his California teaching credential suspended, but not revoked, after being convicted of 17 counts of sexual misconduct with a child under the age of 18.Investigators said Sutliff, who will be heading to state prison shortly after his Oct. 26 sentencing, had an inappropriate, sexual relationship with a former student for 2 ½ years, beginning when she was 16.But Sutliff’s single-subject teaching credential — issued on Aug. 22, 2003 and set to expire Sept. 1, 2008 — remains on hold.A young woman who testified against him said that in 1993 — when she was 16 and he was 21 — they had a brief, consensual fling. The pair worked at Live Oak Park in Temple City.“It shocks me that people don’t understand the severity of sexual abuse when it’s consensual,” said Los Angeles County Deputy District Attorney Phil Wojdak, who prosecuted Sutliff’s case. “The victims’ ability to have healthy relationships with men is taken away from them for years.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.Students in America’s schools are groped. They’re raped. They’re pursued, seduced and think they’re in love.An Associated Press investigation found more than 2,500 cases over five years in which educators were punished for actions from bizarre to sadistic.There are 3 million public school teachers nationwide, most devoted to their work. Yet the number of abusive educators, nearly three for every school day, speaks to a much larger problem in a system that is stacked against victims.Most of the abuse never gets reported. Those cases reported often end with no action. Cases investigated sometimes can’t be proven, and many abusers have several victims.And no one — not the schools, not the courts, not the state or federal governments — has found a surefire way to keep molesting teachers out of classrooms. A teacher at Bonita High School continued teaching for a week after being caught in January of 2006 in a sex sting in Riverside County.A substitute teacher at Northview High School retained a full teaching credential for three months after he was convicted of molesting a 17-year-old he taught at the school.Another teacher, who explained how he let young girls sit on his lap to gratify himself, taught in two nearby school districts before he was jailed.These are only a few instances of a widespread problem in American schools: Sexual misconduct by the very teachers who are supposed to be nurturing the nation’s children.last_img read more

Women interrupt their lives to tend to grievously injured soldiers

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan ClarksonShe would exchange her two-story house in Atlanta for a hotel room on an Army post, watch her nest egg shrink and spend her days helping a 30-year-old son change bandages and wriggle into garments meant to reduce scarring. The sacrifices of injured soldiers, airmen and Marines are recognized with medals and commendations. But the mothers and wives who arrive here wide-eyed and afraid make their own sacrifices – abandoning jobs and homes and delaying retirement to help their wounded children reclaim their lives. “The women here are the heroes, every bit the heroes as their soldiers,” said Judith Markelz, who runs a four-year-old program to aid the families of injured soldiers sent here for treatment. “These kids could not survive without their women.” The patients who arrive at Fort Sam Houston are among the worst wounded in war, suffering the kind of injuries that killed their predecessors in earlier conflicts. So far, about 600 burn victims and 250 amputees have been sent here to recover at the Army’s only burn center and at an amputee rehabilitation program set up since the start of the Iraq war. Their injuries will take multiple surgeries and months or years of recovery and rehabilitation. When the injured arrive, fathers and siblings are often here for the immediate aftermath or early surgeries. But the wives and mothers most often stay, Markelz said. They quit jobs, give up health insurance and abandon homes. “None of us realized people were going to be here two years. That’s not your normal hospital stay,” Markelz said. “They didn’t want to make San Antonio their home. Now, they can vote here.” Markelz, the wife of a retired Fort Sam deputy commander, was hired four years ago to start the Warrior and Family Support Center, a program that has morphed from a few computers in converted conference rooms to a catchall program for families of the wounded. The Army provides housing for families in a post hotel or at one of the Fisher Houses, family-style dorms with a living room, large kitchen and dining room. But most arrive here with few or no friends and with little understanding of what they or their wounded family members will now face. “They come in with their purses like this,” said Markelz, hugging her chest. “They look like a deer in headlights.” Markelz and her staff make sure no one gets past the door without getting noticed. “Did you sign in?” she genially shouts at family members and wounded soldiers between phone calls and assigning tasks to volunteers. In the past four years, family members and wounded have signed in 200,000 times and counting. The assistance center – which will move to a new 12,000-square-foot building next year – provides meals, a place for baffled family members to seek advice, rides to Wal-Mart, just about anything Markelz and her staff find they can do to help. Among the family members who stay for the long haul, about half are wives and half are mothers. Markelz said it’s especially hard on the wives of guardsmen and reservists and on the middle-age mothers of soldiers – women who had well-established civilian lives away from the typically nomadic life of active military families. “They didn’t sign up for that,” she said. Staff Sgt. Michael Lage had always been an independent kid. The youngest of three and the only boy, he was the first to leave home. He joined the Army at 18. He served two full tours in Iraq, first in 2003 and again two years later. Through both tours, his mother prayed and lit a yellow candle every day at a shrine fashioned from his photo, angel figurines and military mementos in front of her fireplace in Atlanta. She continued the ritual when he was deployed a third time in May. But less than a month later, his Bradley Fighting Vehicle was hit by a bomb in Baghdad. Lage was the only one who managed to crawl out or get blown free of the wreckage. He was on fire, still carrying his gun, witnesses later told his family. Rose Lage and her husband, Larry, arrived in San Antonio to find Michael in intensive care in a medically induced coma. He was covered in bandages with tubes coming in and out of his body. His mother recognized her son by his long dark eyelashes. But she wasn’t allowed to touch him, couldn’t embrace him the way she longed to. “It took everything I had to be strong,” she said, her voice breaking. Now, six months have passed since she arrived in San Antonio with one large suitcase. Her husband stayed as long as he could, but he had to return to work after the couple tapped their retirement savings for months. Her two daughters, too, have come to help, but they have their own homes and young children to care for. Rose hasn’t gone anywhere. Days of housekeeping and care for grandkids have been replaced with new routines: the careful wrapping of gauze around reddened skin, vigilant adherence to medication regiments, the zipping and buttoning of Michael’s clothes. “We’ve given up a lot for him,” Rose concedes, sitting in a hotel room where a giant flag signed by her son’s unit hangs. “We’d give up a lot more for him.” Michael is grateful for his mother’s help, but parents and adult children living together can get on each other’s nerves. The close quarters and the stress chafe. “I appreciate her being here, but living in a small hotel room with your mom tends to wear on you a bit,” Michael says. A career soldier and divorced father of 8-year-old twins, he never dreamed he’d be living with or reliant on his mother at age 30. (His son and daughter live in Tennessee with their mother.) Even as a child, he was never good at asking for help, Rose says. “That’s what annoys her most: I never ask for help,” he says. Rose struggles, too, because she knows he doesn’t tell her everything. He holds back some of the emotional and mental struggles that come with such serious injuries and with the memories of friends lost at war. “It’s been very hard because I know he is frustrated because I’m a mom and I haven’t been there. I guess he thinks I don’t know what’s going on,” she says. “They forget that you’re a person. You have a life, that you have feelings.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SAN ANTONIO – Rose Lage swears it is true: Suddenly, in the midst of a fitful night of sleep last June, she knew that her son had been injured in Iraq. “I heard my son’s voice,” she recalls. “It might sound weird, but I heard him holler `Mama!”‘ In fact, Staff Sgt. Michael Lage was the only survivor of a blast that killed four others. Lage suffered third-degree burns to nearly half his body; parts of his nose and ears were missing; and his face, scalp, arms and torso were seared. His left hand had to be amputated. Rose Lage, 54, understood her son’s life would change. But she didn’t understand how much her own quiet life – a life spent playing with grandkids, fishing and preparing for her husband’s retirement – would change, as well. last_img

IS THIS GOING TO BE DONEGAL’S BIGGEST EVER ‘COME DINE WITH ME’?

first_imgPictured are: (Standing) Richard Finney (The Counter), Joe McGee (Joe’s Butchers), Paul McGovern Club PRO(Seated) Alma Kavanagh (Event Organiser), John Haran (Event Organiser) and Club President, Sean Boyle.Photo: Paddy GallagherTV hit ‘Come Dine With Me’ usually involves four or five guests cooking for each other.Now a Co Donegal GAA club is set to launch one that could involve 200!St. Eunan’s GAA Club are holding the novel fundraiser on Saturday, November 23rd. Titled “Come Dine With Eunan’s” this unique event is based on the popular culinary TV show.The club are looking for 200 members to host an evening at home for their friends and family before meeting up at The Grill for a great night’s dancing to music from the 80’s and 90’s.The event is being co-ordinated by Alma Kavanagh and John Haran and promises to be a great night’s craic.“We hope all members will row in with this club fundraiser. We wanted to do something for The Gathering that was unique but also fun. It’s a great chance to get in touch with old friends that maybe have moved down the country due to work or family commitments and it gives them the excuse or reason to come home for a visit and catch up with old team mates and friends,” enthused Alma. “We have been very fortunate also to get both Richard Finney from The Counter (formerly The Wine Buff) and Joe McGee from Joe’s Butchers (Letterkenny Shopping Centre) on board to support the event.“Both will be offering discounts on items such as meats, wines and cheese’s for our participants and these will be available via special vouchers from the organising committee.“We are setting up an event page on Facebook and full details will be available there. It will be like a Christmas night out for the club with The Grill also doing various promotions on the night in support of the event”, she added. IS THIS GOING TO BE DONEGAL’S BIGGEST EVER ‘COME DINE WITH ME’? was last modified: October 22nd, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Come DineCome Dine With MeSt Eunan’s GAA clublast_img read more

SOCCER – DONEGAL LEAGUE ANNOUNCES NEW PLAYER OF THE MONTH AWARDS

first_imgThe Donegal Junior League are delighted to announce that for the first time since the league was formed more than 40 years ago, it will now have a “Player of the Month Award” which the public can vote on.In association with the league’s main sponsor Brian Mc Cormick Sports a shortlist will be drafted at the end of every month during the league season.An app has been designed through our main sponsor and will be available to download from their website www.bmcsports.ie Players of the Month have still to be selected for the months of April and May 2013. These two awards will provide the public with an opportunity to experience and vote prior to the commencement of the new season in late August.This is another step forward for The Donegal Junior League who continue to promote Association Football in the county. We hope that the new venture will be embraced by everyone who attends matches and would like to have their vote recorded for their favourite player.In another new venture the league is currently in discussion with a number of companies and businesses who they hope to sign up to their new Media Partnership initiative.Along with the league’s current sponsors this new group will help bring to the public the best possible coverage of the games in the league through our local media outlets. Full details of this Partnership will be announced soon.  SOCCER – DONEGAL LEAGUE ANNOUNCES NEW PLAYER OF THE MONTH AWARDS was last modified: June 16th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Donegal LeaguePLAYER OF THE MONTHlast_img read more

Women’s Tennis Beats Eastern Illinois, 4-3

first_img 2. Lomas/Kozlowski (DU) def. Summers/Stadalninkalte (EIU) 6-2 5. Emily Pugachevsky (EIU) def. Mela Jaglarz (DU) 7-5, 6-3 Junior Summer Brills clinched the match for Drake with a thrilling 7-6 (5), 7-6 (1) victory over Stella Cliffe at No 1 singles. 2. Tess Herder (DU) def. Kelly Iden (EIU) 6-2, 6-1 The Bulldogs return to action on Sunday, March 19 and host Gustavus Aldophus. The Panthers tied the match with a win at No. 5 singles. Doubles competition 1. Cliffe/Iden (EIU) def. Herder/Williams (DU) 7-6 (2) 3. Pugachersky/Slaria (EIU) def. Brills/Jaglarz (DU) 6-3] Singles competitioncenter_img 3. Joely Lomas (DU) def. Grace Summers (EIU) 6-1, 6-2 After falling behind 1-0, the Bulldogs evened the score with dominating, 6-1, 6-2, win by Joely Lomas at No. 3 singles. Tess Herder put Drake ahead 2-1 with a convincing 6-2, 6-1 victory over Kelly Iden at No. 2. Kenya Williams put the Bulldogs a point away with her 6-4, 6-2 win over Maria Moshteva at No. 4. 6. Kamile Stadalninkaite (EIU) def. Alex Kozlowski (DU) 6-2, 6-3 DES MOINES, Iowa – The Drake University women’s tennis team topped Eastern Illinois, 4-3, on Sunday at the Roger Knapp Tennis Center. 1. Summer Brills (DU) def. Stella Cliffe (EIU) 7-6 (5), 7-6 (1) 4. Kenya Williams (DU) def. Maria Moshteva (EIU) 6-4, 6-2 Drake 4, Eastern Illinois 3March 12, 2017 at Des Moines, Iowa (Roger Knapp Tennis Center)   Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Crusaders clinch Little 4 outright

first_imgIt was senior night at St. Bernard’s Friday, and appropriately it was the seniors who led the way as the Crusaders blew open a tight game in the third quarter on the way to a 58-40 victory over Hoopa Valley.The win gives the St. Bernard’s girls the Little 4 title outright, and earns them not just a bye in next week’s Dick Niclai Tournament, but also a guaranteed home game in the North Coast Section playoffs.“I’m really pleased with their response to Hoopa’s intensity,” St. Bernard’s coach …last_img read more

‘Something is wrong with my brain’: Life after football for one-time California star

first_imgDiantha Stensrud already sensed something was wrong before the call from police that her husband was being detained for his own safety.They had found Rod Stensrud running on busy Sand Hill Road next to the Stanford Shopping Mall that day in 2005. The former Bay Area football star didn’t realize what he had been doing, telling authorities, “Something is wrong with my brain.”The situation highlighted a long, soul-sapping mental decline that physicians diagnosed a year later as early onset …last_img read more

Google, Mozilla & Sunlight Announce Nationwide Government Data Hackathon

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#news#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting The Sunlight Foundation, in partnership with Google, Mozilla and Redhat, today announced a nation-wide weekend hackathon dedicated to coding projects that foster government transparency. Scheduled for December 12th and 13th and titled The Great American Hackathon, the network of events could lead to some really cool developments. Sunlight has some specific suggestions for projects developers might work on (see below) and lots of the unexpected is expected as well.You can help make it happen by signing up to host an event in your town. At least a few awesome things ought to come out of it. Check out the list of what’s been proposed so far.A tool for reporting online privacy violations to the FTC and simultaneously blowing the whistle to all your friends on your favorite social networks? That’s one cool idea. A tool for making Layar Augmented Reality endpoints easily in Django? People would eat that up. (And build projects like Sunlight’s AR Recovery.gov.) A Python wrapper for Sunlight’s competitor to Data.gov, the National Data Catolog API? A computer assisted researcher’s dream come true!What would you like to build or build with other participants in the Hackathon? This is nerdy stuff, too few people appreciate it, but someone just might build software so beneficial to the civic interest that a parade is in order. Maybe a parade in every town that hosts a hackathon. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img marshall kirkpatrick Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Privileges Committee summons activist

first_imgThe Committee on Privileges of the Goa Assembly has issued a notice summoning Right to Information (RTI) activist and State government officer Kashinath Shetye to appear before it on Monday.The notice has been issued by Ligia Godinho, Under-Secretary, Legislature, on November 16, in connection with an alleged breach of privilege motion raised by Bharatiya Janata Party MLA Nilesh Cabral against Mr. Shetye.Mr. Cabral had raised the matter during the monsoon session of the Assembly, after a starred question was allegedly leaked by the activist on Facebook before it was raised in the session.The complaint had been referred to the Privileges Committee by Speaker Pramod Sawant, who had also filed a police complaint and asked the Chief Secretary to investigate the leak.On July 12, Mr. Shetye, who is also a junior engineer with the State electricity department, had uploaded a photograph of Mr. Cabral’s legislative question, prior to it being answered in the Assembly. Mr. Cabral had said Mr.Shetye had not behaved like a government servant.Mr. Shetye had said that he had filed various petitions in the past as a private citizen, and that the Assembly question was an open document sent to various departments, including his.last_img read more